Category Archives: Shows

Posts about shows and programmers.

81 82 83 84 Season 2 Episode 19: Rest Gently, Sweet Poet

Sadly we bid farewell this week to the genius singer, songwriter, and guitarist Tom Verlaine. He was the founder and driving force behind the groundbreaking band Television who reshaped music as part of the late 70’s NYC scene. This week’s show features some of Verlaine’s music. Hope you’ll enjoy and look up more of his stuff if it wasn’t already on your radar.

From the Void Episode #31 – January 31st – Book of Angels

Welcome to Episode 31 of From the Void – CKMS’ Experimental Music Show

Tonight will feature music, exclusively, composed by John Zorn. This set of song is from the first 10 volumes from the second Masada book, the Book of Angels.  It will also feature some Mike Patton…

ALSO!!! I released  ANOTHER new album. Eye, Robot Vol 2 Spotify, You Tube and Bandcamp or where ever you stream your music!

Melt with me in the Void again this week…

Subscribe to the Podcast

Full episodes to enjoy at your leisure https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1–fLGsdUzW5O_9sK_Bzt9fBvBW-GWKBG?usp=sharing

My Music https://deafbydesign.ca/music

See you in the Void!

 

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Jan. 30, 2023 – on air 8-10 pm ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list.

  1. Ted Nugent, Wang Dang Sweet Poontang (live, from Double Live Gonzo! including classic intro “anybody wants to get mellow you can turn around and get the F out of here”)
  2. The Rolling Stones, If You Can’t Rock Me/Get Off Of My Cloud, (live, from Love You Live)
  3. UFO, Rock Bottom (live, from Strangers In The Night)
  4. Led Zeppelin, Heartbreaker/Living Loving Maid (She’s Just A Woman)
  5. Elton John, Street Kids
  6. Chicago, Hideaway
  7. Robin Trower, Day Of The Eagle
  8. Budgie, Breaking All The House Rules
  9. Iron Maiden, Holy Smoke
  10. Deep Purple, Flight Of The Rat
  11. Black Sabbath, Falling Off The Edge Of The World
  12. AC/DC, Nervous Shakedown
  13. Trapeze, Black Cloud
  14. Headstones, The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald
  15. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, Spirit(s) In The Night
  16. Gene Clark, No Other
  17. Eagles, King Of Hollywood
  18. John Mayall, Broken Wings
  19. Television, Marquee Moon

 

My track-by-track tales:

  1. Ted Nugent, Wang Dang Sweet Poontang (live, from Double Live Gonzo! including classic intro “anybody wants to get mellow you can turn around and get the F out of here”) . . . as we begin a mostly hard rocking set.
  1. The Rolling Stones, If You Can’t Rock Me/Get Off Of My Cloud, (live, from Love You Live) . . . In those pre-internet days when you had no real chance to preview stuff and bought it sight unseen and unheard, and not having seen the 1975-76 tour, I remember being thrown a bit, upon buying the Love You Live album, at the re-arrangement of Get Off Of My Cloud tacked on to the rousing version of If You Can’t Rock Me, but quickly grew to love it as much as the original. My older sister did see the Toronto show in 1975 (I didn’t see my first Stones show until 1978 in Buffalo) so she could have warned me, but she’s not as anal and particular about music so I’ll forgive her. 🙂 The Stones have since played Cloud on various tours, in the original arrangement. I love the song – actually heard them rehearsing it at sound check as my older son and I walked around Toronto’s Rogers Centre before the Stones’ 2002 Licks tour show although they didn’t play it that night – and was happy to see/hear them open with it in 2013 in Toronto.
  1. UFO, Rock Bottom (live, from Strangers In The Night) . . . Epic 12-minute shredder courtesy guitarist Michael Schenker and friends, from the band’s classic live album.
  1. Led Zeppelin, Heartbreaker/Living Loving Maid (She’s Just A Woman) . . . I remember my older brother, huge musical influence, bringing home Led Zep II when it came out. We were living in Peru at the time as my father was working there, hence in those days a bit out of touch as to what was happening back home. My older brother and sister were back in Canada in high school and it was always neat when they brought back new stuff, particularly music. Anyway, so big brother brings Zep home and it was mind-blowing to we who to that point had been listening to early Stones and Beatles. Zep was SO heavy in comparison, to us, then. To the point that mom, presaging the mom in Frank Zappa’s song Joe’s Garage, told my brother to ‘turn it down!” But mom later grew to like it, she was very cool. As was dad, who knocked me out when John Lennon was shot and dad said “this is madness!” To that point, I would have bet that dad knew not who John Lennon was. The foolishness of youth.
  1. Elton John, Street Kids . . . I’ve mentioned it before but the Rock of the Westies album is definitely one of those time and place things for me. It was one of just three albums – the others being Beatles and Stones compilations – in our high school weight room. So, my football teammates and I played them incessantly while working out. Sometimes I wonder if I’d have gotten into the Elton album so much otherwise. Probably, as I’m a fan of his 1970s stuff, but it’s a wonderful memory and a special album to me. I still ‘see’ the guys in my mind when I listen to any of the songs from it. I still don’t care so much for the single, Island Girl, obviously a well-constructed song with obvious commercial appeal, but the rest of it, EJ rocking out, makes it one of my favorite records of his.
  1. Chicago, Hideaway . . . I’m a huge fan of Chicago’s first three albums, when they were an innovative jazz-rock fusion outfit and while I have all of the albums from the guitarist Terry Kath era and like them, I tend to focus on the first three records and then the big hits from the rest of the catalog from that period. But, a few years ago, a friend of mine reminded me of this great rocker from Chicago VIII and I played it on the show then. Here it is again.
  1. Robin Trower, Day Of The Eagle . . . Speaking of great guitarists like Kath, here’s Trower, from the Bridge of Sighs album. This track is why you buy, or listen to, full studio albums. Amazingly, it’s not on any Trower compilations, to my knowledge.
  1. Budgie, Breaking All The House Rules . . . As someone commented on YouTube about this song, more great riffs in one song than many bands manage on an entire album. Budgie never made it really big in a commercial sense but the hard-rocking Welsh group was influential. Metallica swears by them and has covered several of their tunes.
  1. Iron Maiden, Holy Smoke . . . I like a lot of Iron Maiden, like this rocker (as if they do much else and that’s great) but I only listen to their studio stuff. I had a live album once, but I quickly got sick of frontman Bruce Dickinson urging the crowd to ‘scream for me (insert city/venue).” It’s as bad as Ozzy Osbourne live albums with his incessant “clap your effing hands!” etc. But I do like both artists, really I do.
  1. Deep Purple, Flight Of The Rat . . . I really don’t know what to say anymore about this song, the In Rock album, or Deep Purple in general aside from I love ’em, every incarnation (OK, the one album, Slaves and Masters, they did with Joe Lynn Turner singing, not so much, aside from the song King of Dreams). What a kick-butt tune this is.
  1. Black Sabbath, Falling Off The Edge Of The World . . . Starts slow but you just know it’s coming as the tension builds . . . and at about 1:30 in, it starts, then all hell breaks loose at 2:06 with yet another monumental Tony Iommi riff from his apparently bottomless basket, soon to be joined by the incomparable vocals of Ronnie James Dio. From the Mob Rules album.

     

  2. AC/DC, Nervous Shakedown . . . 1983’s Flick of the Switch, the third album with Brian Johnson having replaced the dear departed Bon Scott, didn’t do nearly as well commercially as Back in Black and For Those About To Rock, mainly because it had no huge hit singles although the title cut did reasonably well and this track was a No. 35 hit in the UK. I just love the how would one describe it, descending sort of chorus? AC/DC didn’t really have another big hit album, in terms of universal appeal, until Thunderstruck and other hits carried The Razors Edge to such status in 1990. But the intervening albums, Flick of the Switch, Fly On The Wall, Who Made Who (a soundtrack to Stephen King’s Maximum Overdrive movie) and Blow Up Your Video are full of great tracks like this one, Sink The Pink, Shake Your Foundations, Who Made Who, Heatseeker and others, just to name the singles alone.
  1. Trapeze, Black Cloud . . . Terrific band, Trapeze, from which emerged bass player/singer Glenn Hughes, later of course to join Deep Purple, drive Ritchie Blackmore nuts with his more funky approach which I liked actually – see my earlier thoughts on every incarnation of Purple. But look on the bright side. Had Blackmore not gotten pissed off – which I never really understood, it was essentially his band, why if he didn’t like the direction didn’t he put his foot down? Anyway, had Blackmore not up and left, maybe we’d not have had the band Rainbow. So from ‘bad’ can always come good.

     

  2. Headstones, The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald . . . Rocked up version of the Gordon Lightfoot classic, a song that never fails to bring a tear to my eye. I’ve never been a fan of music videos, to me they’re like when a movie is made from a novel and then re-releases of the book have an actor on the cover. It’s why I read the book first; I like to have a picture in my mind of the characters. Same with songs, I don’t want them interpreted for me via video although I respect it’s the artist’s interpretation. However, I will say that the Headstones video of this song, I do like, lead singer Hugh Dillon for the most part just singing, on a frozen lake and then into a performance video of the band playing.
  1. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, Spirit(s) In The Night . . . Terrific cover of the Bruce Springsteen-penned tune. Mann’s band also had a big hit, of course, with their cover of what had been a relatively obscure Springsteen tune, Blinded By The Light. Spirit In The Night was Springsteen’s original title but in some markets the Earth Band version was released as Spirits In The Night.
  1. Gene Clark, No Other . . . Classic title cut from the Byrd-man’s 1974 album. Inexplicably, the record was savaged by critics and was not promoted by the record company, ensuring commercial failure. Later, of course, retrospective reviews praised it, and deservedly so. Critics (cue the eye rolls).
  1. Eagles, King Of Hollywood . . . I’ve said it many times before. The Long Run, which tends to be dismissed by critics (and even Eagles band members) as inferior to its predecessor Hotel California, is that album’s equal in my opinion. Yeah, the band may have been fragmenting and so on at that point but some of the deep cuts, like this one, are dark, introspective and great art. Rolling Stone magazine liked it and I agree with the mag’s review: “Overall, The Long Run is a synthesis of previous macabre Eagles motifs, with cynical new insights that are underlined by slashing rock and roll . . . it is a bitter, wrathful, difficult record, full of piss and vinegar and poisoned expectations.” That’s why I like it.
  1. John Mayall, Broken Wings . . . One of my favorite Mayall songs, from his The Blues Alone album, 1967. Sad, and beautiful.
  1. Television, Marquee Moon . . . Another musician death. Tom Verlaine, Television leader, guitarist and frontman, died Saturday at age 73. As previously mentioned, it took me forever to ‘get’ the Marquee Moon album which may be strange given I was into new wave, punk and so on at the time, 1977, the record was released. But, I missed it, somehow although I owned it, perhaps as a ‘necessary’ or ‘influential’ album we music aficionados tend to have, just to have because they’re deemed important. And they are. Anyway, it wasn’t until a few years ago that I ‘got’ the record and, in particular, its title cut. I was in a used CD store and a song was playing, Marquee Moon it turned out. I liked it, as never before. It just hit me that day, for whatever reason. Interesting how that sort of thing happens.

The “Father To Son” Show

Saturday January 28, 2023 @ 12 Noon

Please join us for our first Indie Show!

(All songs are chosen from music sent into the radio station)

Song List...

You Look Good in Yellow – Moira and Claire (Nova Scotia)

Death is an Exhale – Mythmaking (Alberta)

Flowers Wild – Kyra and Tully (Ontario)

Run For Your Life – Jake Ian (Alberta)

Letter To My Son – Ken Dunn (Ontario)

Carve Your Name – Last Birds (Saskatchewan)

All You Never Wanted – The Sheveled (Alberta)

Pools of Light – Jessica Moss (Quebec)

Be there or be…………somewhere else!

Cheers!

Gary and Ben

 

Listen For Smooth Contemporary QUINTE JAZZ

Saturday January 28 9 AM
After broadcast on SoundCloud
https://soundcloud.com/user-163878073/sets/quinte-jazz

Chris Standring Shadow Of A Doubt SIMPLE THINGS 2022
chrisstandring.com
Paula Atherton Ready Or Not 2022 paulaatherton.com
Jazz Holdouts Workin’ HOLDING ON 2022 www.jazzholdoutsmusic.com
Eric Darius That’s My Jam UNLEASHED 2022 www.ericdarius.com
Regan Whiteside Thrill Ride THRILL RIDE 2022 raganwhiteside.com/home
🍁Holly Burke Bill Runge Music For Maple & Monkey Puzzle DREAMRIDE 2022 billrunge.com/music
Castella ft. Marqueal Jordan I Saw You 2022 www.castellamusic.com
Dave Kowaleski KC IN The Clouds UNDER MOJAVE MOON 2022 davekowaleski.com
🍁Matt Greenwood From Sunshine ATLAS 2023 orangegrovepublicity.com/Clients/matt-greenwood-atlas
Marcus Anderson Reverse marcusanderson.net/about
🍁Darren Rahn Everlasting ROCK THE WORLD 2022 www.darrenrahn.com
Brandon Marceal WAAY Up 2022 brandonmarceal.com

So Old It’s New ‘2’ set list for Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023 – on air 7-9 am ET

My track-by-track tales follow the bare-bones list, after my preamble about the inspiration behind the set list.

The first half of the set is inspired by a documentary I watched this week – Under The Volcano, about AIR Studio on the volcanic Caribbean island of Montserrat. The first 12 songs I’m playing appeared on albums I own that were recorded there, in whole or in part. The result is an amalgam of artists, genres and styles.

AIR (Associated Independent Recordings) was established by the late Sir George Martin, best known as The Beatles’ longtime producer, and several other leading British producers. They opened a studio in London in 1970, adding Montserrat in 1979. The island studio flourished under the then-dormant Soufriere Hills volcano until 1989 when it was damaged not by an eruption but by Hurricane Hugo in September of that year, shortly after The Rolling Stones finished recording their Steel Wheels album.

The volcano emerged out of dormancy and became active in 1995 and has continued to erupt since although it’s been, apparently, relatively quiet for the last 10 years. The volcanic activity led the government of the island, a British Overseas Territory, to establish an exclusion zone in the area of volcanic activity, splitting the island in two.

Here’s the bare-bones set list:

 

  1. Jimmy Buffett, Volcano
  2. Mike + The Mechanics, Silent Running (On Dangerous Ground)
  3. The Police, Demolition Man
  4. The Rolling Stones, Hearts For Sale
  5. Paul McCartney, Ballroom Dancing
  6. Gillan and Glover, I Can’t Dance To That
  7. Dire Straits, Ride Across The River
  8. Black Sabbath, The Shining
  9. Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe, Birthright
  10. Nazareth, Boys In The Band
  11. Rush, Middletown Dreams
  12. Status Quo, The Wanderer
  13. Free, Catch A Train
  14. Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Last Rebel
  15. Johnny Winter, Rollin’ ‘Cross The Country
  16. Patti Smith Group, (Privilege) Set Me Free
  17. Blue Cheer, Saturday Freedom
  18. Bruce Springsteen, The Price You Pay
  19. The Smashing Pumpkins, Zero
  20. Marianne Faithfull, Truth Bitter Truth
  21. Rod Stewart (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want To Be Right
  22. The J. Geils Band, Wreckage
  23. Neil Young, No More
  24. Fairport Convention, Farewell Farewell 

    And my track-by-track tales:

    1. Jimmy Buffett, Volcano . . . Buffett’s tongue in cheek title track take on recording under the gun, so to speak, on Montserrat for his 1979 album. The island’s volcano, then dormant, started erupting again in 1995, six years after AIR Studio was damaged by Hurricane Hugo. 
    2. Mike + The Mechanics, Silent Running (On Dangerous Ground) . . . I pulled this from the 3-CD Genesis compilation R-Kive which features Genesis band and solo work by Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford. I wouldn’t own any Banks or Rutherford solo stuff otherwise. Silent Running, a hit single, was sung by Paul Carrack, well known for the Ace hit How Long and Squeeze’s Tempted. The (On Dangerous Ground) part was added to the song’s title when it became part of the movie Choke Canyon – which was called On Dangerous Ground outside the USA. To quote Robert Shaw’s character in the 1973 movie The Sting, ‘ya falla (follow)?’. I do actually, although I never saw Choke Canyon, as either Choke Canyon or On Dangerous Ground. I did, however, see The Sting, as I date myself. Great, fun flick, featuring Paul Newman and Robert Redford, along with Shaw. Fifty – 50 – years ago!
    1. The Police, Demolition Man . . . From 1981’s Ghost In The Machine album. The Police originally gave the Sting-penned song to Grace Jones, didn’t like what she did with it for her 1981 Nightclubbing album, so did their own version for later that year on Ghost In The Machine. I prefer The Police song but don’t mind Jones’s version. It’s an electronic/dance take and I like her vocals/singing style. The Police version is more straight rock. Great fun, regardless, if a quote about it from Police guitarist Andy Summers, via Wikipedia, is accurate: “It’s a very simple song. We all listened to the Grace Jones version and thought ‘shit, we can do it much better than that.’ It was a one-take job. To me, our version is more ballsy, which is what you’d expect from Grace Jones.”
    1. The Rolling Stones, Hearts For Sale . . . Triple guitar attack on this deep cut from Steel Wheels. Mick Jagger’s distorted riff (yup, him, not Keith Richards) starts the track and continues, for the most part, until various Jagger harmonica breaks four minutes into the tune while Richards and Ronnie Wood, who adds a fine solo, maintain the rhythm along with, of course, the so-called (by Richards) engine room of drummer Charlie Watts and bassist Bill Wyman.
    1. Paul McCartney, Ballroom Dancing . . . One of those infectious tunes McCartney can seemingly toss off without even thinking. But then, that’s why he’s McCartney with his innate sense of melody and hooks. Could easily have been a single, I think, from 1982’s Tug of War album, from which his duet with Stevie Wonder, Ebony and Ivory, became a No. 1 hit. The other hit single was Take It Away, with Ringo Starr on drums. The album was produced by George Martin.
    1. Gillan and Glover, I Can’t Dance To That . . . Up-tempo tune, one of the more rock-oriented ones on the quite diverse and interesting Accidentally On Purpose album released by the Deep Purple duo of singer Ian Gillan and bass player Roger Glover in 1988.
    1. Dire Straits, Ride Across The River . . . You can actually feel as if you are riding down a river, probably in the jungle, listening to this one. From the commercial monster, and deservedly so, Brothers In Arms album, one of the first albums recorded on a digital tape machine, in 1985.
    1. Black Sabbath, The Shining . . . From 1987’s The Eternal Idol, with Tony Martin on lead vocals for the first of five studio albums he recorded with the band between 1987 and 1995. It came during a period of time during which only guitarist Tony Iommi remained a constant original member amid a cast of seeming thousands, including original bassist Geezer Butler who was in and out while Iommi kept the brand going while producing those five, to me, very good and underappreciated albums. But then, I’m a big Sabbath fan and not one of those who say things like ‘no Ozzy (or Ronnie James Dio), no Sabbath’. No Iommi, no Sabbath, to that I’ll agree.
    1. Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe, Birthright . . . Fleetwood Mac’s original leader, from the blues band days, later formed a band called Peter Green’s Splinter Group but that splinter group had nothing on Yes. Space doesn’t permit the full story but suffice it to say that the convoluted Yes saga makes for interesting reading, if one is so inclined. It’s led to competing versions of Yes, legal issues regarding the name, and various spinoff bands. So, in 1989 you had what many would consider ‘classic’ 1970s Yes members – singer Jon Anderson, drummer Bill Bruford, keyboardist Rick Wakeman and guitarist Steve Howe – coming out with their one and only album under that name. It sounds like, what else, 1970s Yes. That’s because Anderson wanted to return to progressive rock, having had enough of the pop-rock direction Yes had taken, with guitarist Trevor Rabin at the helm, for massive hits like Owner Of A Lonely Heart that Anderson did sing. Birthright is an appropriately haunting song about British nuclear tests during the 1950s and resulting radioactive waste left on aboriginal lands in Australia, for which compensation was eventually paid. As for Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe, there was to be a second album but that morphed into Union, Yes’s 1991 album featuring various members of both factions, including original/constant Yes bass player Chris Squire, who died in 2015. The Union album resulted from a meeting in Los Angeles between Anderson and Rabin, who originally were working on separate albums by the respective camps but decided to merge them. What tangled webs are weaved.
    1. Nazareth, Boys In The Band . . . Abrasive, urgent, fast track from 1982’s 2XS album.
    1. Rush, Middletown Dreams . . . Like many who like Rush, perhaps, I’m not a big fan of the so-called keyboard or synthesizer era that is most pronounced, certainly in terms of production, on the trilogy of albums – Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows and Hold Your Fire – between 1984 and 1987. I have them, but don’t listen to them much although I do like hits like The Big Money, from Power Windows. That’s the album I pulled Middletown Dreams from. I hadn’t heard the song in ages but it was a nice rediscovery, some good guitar from Alex Lifeson but the song is compelling, to me, thanks to the propulsive percussion of the late great drummer Neil Peart.
    1. Status Quo, The Wanderer . . . Cover of the 1961 Dion hit. Quo’s version made No. 7 in the UK and No. 3 in Ireland in 1984, and was included on the expanded 2006 re-release of their 1983 album Back To Back. And with that, so ends the Montserrat AIR Studio segment of the show.
    1. Free, Catch A Train . . . Haven’t played Free in a while. I just picked a random track, but probably not so random given how my brain works as I realized it fits with The Wanderer, who is catching a train, setting me off on another of my song title connections.
    1. Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Last Rebel . . . Bluesy ballad, title cut from the 1993 album and among my favorites from the post-plane crash versions of the band.
    1. Johnny Winter, Rollin’ ‘Cross The Country . . . Johnny raunches and rolls with a tune written by brother Edgar, who plays organ on the track and on many more songs on Johnny’s 1974 album, Saints and Sinners.
    1. Patti Smith Group, (Privilege) Set Me Free . . . Spooky, powerful tune from the Easter album.
    1. Blue Cheer, Saturday Freedom . . . From the band’s self-titled fourth album, released in December, 1969. By that point the group had experienced some lineup changes and was offering a more laid back, bluesy yet still heavy sound. A nice groove on this one.
    1. Bruce Springsteen, The Price You Pay . . . From The River, the third of the amazing run of three albums Springsteen released from 1975-80, the other two being Born To Run (1975) and Darkness On The Edge Of Town (1978). They remain my favorites of his, in terms of front-to-back listens.
    1. The Smashing Pumpkins, Zero . . . Sounds crazy, perhaps, but I had forgotten about this one. It was a single from the No. 1 album, Mellon Collie and The Infinite Sadness, released in 1995. Good metallic rocker, I just happened to come across it while searching for other stuff I’ve loaded into the station computer. A worthwhile revisit.
    1. Marianne Faithfull, Truth Bitter Truth . . . From 1981’s Dangerous Acquaintances, the follow-up to Faithfull’s 1979 comeback record, Broken English. Music journalists didn’t like the album as much, considering it a safer/more conventional record than Broken English. Fair enough, perhaps, but this song has depth, if that’s what the critics were seeking. Besides, it’s Faithfull’s ‘a lived life’ cigarette and alcohol-affected vocals on Broken English forward that set her apart.
    1. Rod Stewart (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want To Be Right . . . Stewart has written or co-written many great songs, like Maggie May, Mandolin Wind, the Faces’ Stay With Me to name just a few. But his genius during his heyday was also his ability to select great songs to cover and do them amazing justice. Like this one, by the Stax writing team of Homer Banks, Carl Hampton and Raymond Jackson that was a deserved No. 3 Billboard and No. 1 R & B hit for Luther Ingram in 1972. Stewart’s version is from his 1978 album Footloose and Fancy Free.
    1. The J. Geils Band, Wreckage . . . Dark, bluesy cut from a largely dark album, 1977’s Monkey Island.
    1. Neil Young, No More . . . Well, one more, after this track from Young’s 1989 Freedom album.
    1. Fairport Convention, Farewell Farewell . . . The wonderful voice of Sandy Denny on lead vocals. A sad story, Denny. Beset by drug and alcohol abuse and what some suggest was a manic-depressive condition, depending what you read, she died after a fall down a flight of stairs in 1978, age 31. But we still have the music upon which her amazing voice rides, and elevates.

 

CKMS Community Connections for 23 January 2023 with Peter Tudisco of the Kiwanis Club of Cambridge

Show Notes

(headshot of a man smiling into the camera)
Peter Tudisco

Jeff Stager talks with Peter Tudisco of the Kiwanis Club of Cambridge about service clubs.

The interview starts at 6m59s.

Kiwanis Club of Cambridge

Peter Tudisco

Upcoming Events

Podcast

Download: ckms-community-connections-2023-01-23-episode111.mp3 (55.2 MB, 57m29s, episode 111)

Index

Time Title Album Artist
0m00s Theme for CKMS Community Connections ccc CKMS Sunflower logo (yellow petals surrounding a black centre with white wavies all on a teal background)
CKMS Community Connections
Steve Todd
0m28s Jeff Stager introduces Peter Tudisco, who introduces the first song.
2m19s Moondance Van Morrison Moondance (four small headshots of Van Morrison along the left side, one large headshot of Van Morrison turned one-quarter to the right below the text)
Moondance
Van Morrison
6m59s Getting to know Peter Tudisco.
11m27s Fly Me To The Moon Frank Sinatra - Count Basie and his orchestra | It Might As Well Be Swing | arranged by Quincy Jones (disembodied heads of Frank Sinatra wearing a fedora and Count Basie wearing a captain's hat, surrounded by the song titles on the album in blue, green, and purple text; "It Might As Well Be Swing" is in red curly text swooping from top left to middle right)
It Might As Well Be Swing
Frank Sinatra
14m04s Learning more about Peter, and his 25 years with Kiwanis and giving back to the community. His involvement with service clubs has enabled him to travel. Recently Peter has rekindled his interest in music.
21m12s Moonshadow Cat Stevens (text above an illustration of a young boy wearing a top hat, beside an orange cat, both sitting on the edge of a sidewalk in front of a broken fence with an old tree on the right, and the moon above the fence)
Teaser and the Firecat
Cat Stevens
23m54s

Different service clubs have their own objectives and origins. Kiwanis has existed for 108 years, started in Detroit, Hamilton had the first Canadian Kiwanis club. Peter has just moved to Ayr, wants to start a Kiwanis club in North Dumfries.

The Kiwanis slogan is “Kids need Kiwanis”, its purpose is to improve the lives of children around the world, starting in their own communities. The ideas come from the communities where the clubs are. There is still a Moose Lodge in Kitchener. “Kiwanis” is a First Nations name, meaning “We trade”.

It’s not just about providing services, but there’s also the social aspects of the club. Even today there are gaps in services that Kiwanis fills.

Peter tells us about the “Fallen Sparrows” foundation, raising money for families with disabled children. Peter calls these experiences “Kiwanis moments”.

There are 17 countries in the Eastern Canada and Caribbean district, including the tip of South America.

Peter tells of the world-famous Kiwanis music festival. Elvis Presley was a Kiwanis “Key Clubber”, the student-led organization of Kiwanis.

36m40s Harvest Moon Neil Young - Harvest Moon (silhouette of a man wearing a coat with fringes, walking in a meadow under a cloudy sky)
Harvest Moon
Neil Young
41m32s Peter is setting up a new Kiwanis club in Ayr. The community is expanding. This would be for North Dumfries, including Clyde, Roseville, even Glen Morris. Peter tells us about the Information Meeting about the new club location. Peter tells of the other members involved in doing the work.
47m49s Dancing In The Moonlight King Harvest | Dancing in the Moonlight - Lady, Come On Home (B&W photo of six men standing on a street corner, some leaning against a lamp post, with ladders and old buildings in the background)
Dancing In The Moonlight – Lady, Come On Home
King Harvest
50m44s

Peter repeats the invitation to the Information Meeting. A new club needs a minimum of 15 members, there will be an organizational meeting in February, and then they’ll apply to Kiwanis International to get their charter.

Peter tells us what he’s doing in the next 2 hours, 2 days, 2 weeks, 2 months, and 2 years.

56m29s End credits.

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Friday from 3:00pm to 4:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

CKMS logo with wavies coming out the sidesSubscribe to the CKMS Community Connections podcast!

CKMS | 102.7 FM | Radio Waterloo | Community ConnectionsSee all CKMS Community Connections shows!

Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2023 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

From the Void Episode #30 – January 24th

Welcome to Episode 30 of From the Void – CKMS’ Experimental Music Show

Tonight will feature Mike Patton,  Virgil Donati, Carl King, Devin Townsend, Mike Keneally, Derek Sherinian, King Crimson, Stick Men and Dwieezel  Zappa

ALSO!!! I released  ANOTHER new album. Everything Vol 2 Spotify, You Tube and Bandcamp or where ever you stream your music!

Melt with me in the Void again this week…

Subscribe to the Podcast

Full episodes to enjoy at your leisure https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1–fLGsdUzW5O_9sK_Bzt9fBvBW-GWKBG?usp=sharing

My Music https://deafbydesign.ca/music

See you in the Void!

 

 

Klausterfokken Playlist for January 23rd, 2023, 10pm – 12am ET

Artist – Song Title
Mason Tikl – Klausterfokken Opener
VOLA – Head Mounted Sideways
Dead Celebrity Status – Pretty Little Creepshow
Pendulum – Midnight Runner
Porcupine Tree – Herd Culling
Ace Kinkaid – I’m An Accident
Men Without Hats – Jenny Wore Black
Wilderun – Identifier
Infinite Replay – Boxcar
Haken – Taurus
Deadmau5 – Aural Psynapse
Sleep Token – Aqua Regia
Ace Kinkaid – Wyckyd Sceptre
HOST – My Only Escape
Nothing More – Dream With Me
Nothing More – Neverland
Katatonia – Colossal Shade

CKMS Community Connections for 20 January 2023 with Tim McInnes

Show Notes

(headshot of Tim McInnes wearing a fedora and dark sunglasses)
Tim McInnes

Tim McInnes joins Bob Jonkman by telephone to talk about his music, collaborators, composing, pianos, and classical composers.

The interview starts at 5m20s.

Online:

Podcast

Download: ckms-community-connections-2023-01-20-episode110.mp3 (55.3 MB, 57m31s, episode 110)

Index

Time Title Album Artist
0m00s Theme for CKMS Community Connections ccc CKMS Sunflower logo (yellow petals surrounding a black centre with white wavies all on a teal background)
CKMS Community Connections
Steve Todd
1m00s Repetitive Stress Shadowlife | Tim McInnes (photo of the shadow of a man cast on a concrete sidewalk)
Shadowlife
Tim McInnes
3m07s Basketball Rock
5m20s Tim tells us about Basketball Rock, more of a novelty song for him, but now the music he writes is labelled “neo-classical”. All his songs are recorded at River Music Studios in London, Ontario, the better for the quality of the music. Tim Schwindt, propietor of River Music did the guitar, bass, and drums; Tim (McInnes) played the piano and sang the vocals, and, of course, wrote the song . Tim’s first album was almost all ragtime music, with seven Jellyroll Morton covers, and seven of his own compositions in the ragtime vein. His second album, Shadowlife is almost all his own music. Tim says you can hear his style get more serious, for example he says Repetitive Stress is being picked up on dark, lugubrious playlists on Spotify. Tim wrote It’s A Sad Song and An Even Sadder Song in an attempt to create the saddest song ever written. Certainly it’s the saddest song Tim could write.
9m11s Tim is mostly self-taught. He took piano as a kid and teenager, but what he doesn’t know about music theory would fit into a good-sized warehouse. He finds YouTube useful for picking up music theory. Introducing An Even Sadder Song (but Bob plays Music For Money instead).
10m05s Music For Money Shadowlife | Tim McInnes (photo of the shadow of a man cast on a concrete sidewalk)
Shadowlife
Tim McInnes
12m10s An Even Sadder Song
15m05s The viola and violin parts were played by Tim’s neighbour, Kelvin Enns, the principal viola player for the London Symphonia. Kelvin and Tim have collaborated on several pieces, including For Ukraine and Almost Home. Tim has also collaborated with Jessie Grandmont on the song Ghost Dance. Jesse is currently touring with Fiddler on the Loose (plug plug!) playing in Drayton, Petrolia, and even in the United States. He’s an excellent violin player, and Tim says he just plays some triads on the piano…
17m01s Bob comments on Tim’s varied repertoire; Tim says he’s narrowing down to writing only neo-classical music. But every now and then a funny song occurs to him, like Better Days, about vaccination, in which he also plays ukelele. Current events sometimes get Tim going, like writing a pro-vax song to counter the anti-vax songs.
19m06s Tim just had a birthday (the Big Seven-Oh); he started his “music business” after he retired from being a forklift driver. He started seriously playing music in 2015 playing at the McCormick Home for Alzheimers patients, every now and then sneaking in his own compositions. Once Tim started getting ready to record the songs just kept coming. All of Tim’s musical connections (collaborators, studio, playing venue) are within walking distance of his home. Tim stays out of the spotlight, preferring to do studio work and writing songs rather than performing. He’d love to find other people to perform his music. Some of Tim’s music is getting thousands of streams on Spotify.
23m13s Tim is working on a new song. It was something Tim had heard before — something he had written himself. But Tim says it’s not wrong to steal from yourself. Sometimes Tim thought he was in a rut, but then a brand-new melody occurs to him. There are hundreds of songs that have gone through the transom of his mind; there are parts of songs, ones for which there’s no ending, and some he’s just plain forgotten. Tim can’t keep two different songs in his head. A new song will knock out the one that was there. Tim set up a video camera to film himself playing, so if he forgets something he can go back to remind himself of the melody. Tim introduces Ghost Dance with Jesse Grantmont on violin.
25m57s Ghost Dance (Tim McInnes standing beside a statue hanging upside-down at the side of a pond)
(single)
Tim McInnes
29m51s Pandemic Rag
34m04s Music Box Waltz
36m49s Talking about the instrumentation on Music Box Waltz — it’s a celeste, also used in Mozart’s Magic Flute and Tchaikovsy’s Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, then Music Box Waltz switches to a Fazioli-sound piano. Tim is a connoisseur, he can tell the difference between a Bösendorfer, Yamaha, or Steinway piano. For some songs he uses the effect of an upright or broken-down piano, for example in Silent Movie Heroics.
39m12s Silent Movie Heroics (headshot of Tim McInnes wearing a fedora and dark sunglasses)
(single)
Tim McInnes
41m44s Silent Movie Heroics is meant to emulate movies of Douglas Fairbanks Sr., swashbuckling, swordfights, and chases. It’s a change of pace from the serious neo-classical stuff. The slightly out-of-tune piano sound is an effect added digitally to a midi keyboard. Done professionally, the effects sound like the real thing.
43m41s On Music For Money that’s Tim’s brother Brad McInnes playing the Irish flute. Tim told him what the melody was, then Brad was on his own. Tim hasn’t collaborated on composing, but he has “borrowed” from other composers, for example Almost Home sounds a lot like Beethoven’s Pathétique.
44m59s Almost Home (photo of a the front door of a detached house, with snow-covered shrubbery in front)
(single)
Tim McInnes
47m18s Introduction to Chopinish.
48m00s Chopinish Tim McInnes | Selfie (headshot of Tim McInnes laughing, wearing a baseball cap and sunglasses)
Selfie
Tim McInnes
49m43s Does Tim deliberately try to emulate other composers? He did in this case, although he says his composition is not as sophisticated, and doesn’t have as much “meat on the bone” as Chopin’s real music, but it’s a suggestion of his music. Tim suggests playing Backwards Boogie.
51m04s Backwards Boogie Shadowlife | Tim McInnes (photo of the shadow of a man cast on a concrete sidewalk)
Shadowlife
Tim McInnes
53m15s What’s backwards about Backwards Boogie? Tim says it’s the left hand — if you play it backwards you’ll get some subliminal messages. Tim went into the studio and improvised. It’s not a three-chord boogie but a six-chord boogie. Tim prefers people use Spotify to get his music, wants to get Ghost Dance over 1,000 streams.

Bob gives the end credits.

56m01s Shadowlife (playout) Shadowlife | Tim McInnes (photo of the shadow of a man cast on a concrete sidewalk)
Shadowlife
Tim McInnes

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Friday from 3:00pm to 4:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

CKMS logo with wavies coming out the sidesSubscribe to the CKMS Community Connections podcast!

CKMS | 102.7 FM | Radio Waterloo | Community ConnectionsSee all CKMS Community Connections shows!

Bonus Video

YouTube: CKMS Community Connections for 20 January 2023

Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2023 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Jan. 23, 2023 – on air 8-10 pm ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list.

  1. Spencer Davis Group, Keep On Running
  2. Dire Straits, Solid Rock (live, Alchemy album)
  3. J.J. Cale, Rock and Roll Records
  4. Alice Cooper, Generation Landslide
  5. David + David, Swallowed By The Cracks
  6. The Rolling Stones, Do You Think I Really Care (Some Girls album outtake)
  7. Mudcrutch, Scare Easy
  8. Steppenwolf, Renegade
  9. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Deja Vu
  10. The Byrds, Everybody’s Been Burned
  11. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Lee Shore
  12. Crosby, Stills & Nash, Shadow Captain
  13. Crosby, Stills & Nash, In My Dreams
  14. Crosby, Stills & Nash, Yours And Mine
  15. David Crosby, Drive My Car
  16. Deep Purple, Vavoom: Ted The Mechanic
  17. ZZ Top, Manic Mechanic
  18. David Bowie, Drive-In Saturday
  19. Moby Grape, Sitting By The Window
  20. Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Temptation
  21. Jethro Tull, She Said She Was A Dancer
  22. Afro Celt Soundsystem with Robert Plant, Life Begin Again
  23. Carla Olson & Mick Taylor, Winter
  24. Sass Jordan, Leaving Trunk
  25. Talking Heads, What A Day That Was (live, from Stop Making Sense)


    My track-by-track tales:

    1. Spencer Davis Group, Keep On Running . . . Interesting, perhaps, how songs do in different countries. Written by Jamaican singer-songwriter Jackie Edwards, the Spencer Davis Group, fronted by singer-guitarist Steve Winwood, took it to No. 1 in the UK in late 1965. It only managed No. 76 in the US although it did hit No. 22 in Canada and was a top 10 hit in most of Europe. Within two years, the band had universal chart success with Gimme Some Lovin’ and I’m A Man, later nicely covered by Chicago on that band’s debut album.
    1. Dire Straits, Solid Rock (live, Alchemy album) . . . Almost double the length of the 3:19 version from 1980’s Making Movies studio album, this is from 1984’s Alchemy, a document of the band’s 1982 Love Over Gold album tour.
    1. J.J. Cale, Rock and Roll Records . . . From the always dependable late great artist. So consistently good. My only criticism, if it’s that, would be that so many of his songs are too short. On the other hand, always leave them wanting more. A perfect example of that would be Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Fortunate Son, which always prompts me into multiple replays.
    1. Alice Cooper, Generation Landslide . . . This song, and the whole Billion Dollar Babies album always takes me back to high school, grades 9 and 10 for me, the 1972-73 and ’73-74 school years. We had a juke box in our cafeteria and for much of that period of time you could count on hearing this song, Hello Hooray, Elected, No More Mr. Nice Guy or the title track – all school day long. And why not? It’s a great album.
    1. David + David, Swallowed By The Cracks . . . Back to Boomtown I go, drawing from the 1986 album from Davids Baerwald and Ricketts that, arguably, not a lot of people are familiar with but those who are ackowledge as a terrific release. Every song is good. Both guys contributed songs and playing (Baerwald guitar, Ricketts bass) to Sheryl Crow’s 1993 debut album Tuesday Night Music Club. Baerwald continues to release sporadic solo records while also working on TV and movie scores, while Ricketts moved largely into record production and session playing gigs.
    1. The Rolling Stones, Do You Think I Really Care . . . Up tempo country tune from the original Some Girls album sessions. It was released, along with other outtakes from the sessions, on the bonus disc of the 2011 deluxe re-issue.
    1. Mudcrutch, Scare Easy . . . Featuring Tom Petty, guitarist Mike Campbell and keyboard player Benmont Tench, Mudcrutch was the precursor to Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. They formed in Florida in the early 1970s, were unsuccessful in terms of recorded releases but reformed in 2007 and produced two albums, Mudcrutch in 2008 and Mudcrutch 2 in 2016. The latter album was Petty’s last recorded studio work before his death. This is from the first album and the band sounds like, well, Tom Petty. Nice guitar by Campbell and Tom Leadon, the brother of former Eagles’ guitarist and banjo player Bernie Leadon.
    1. Steppenwolf, Renegade . . . Jon Kay’s autobiographical song about his childhood escape, with his mother, from Germany in 1945 ahead of the advancing Soviet troops near the end of World War II.

       

    2. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Deja Vu . . . Title cut from the band’s 1970 album, the first of a mini-set in tribute to last week’s passing of David Crosby at age 81. All songs in the set were written, or co-written, by Crosby. I hope this doesn’t sound bad but, I’m not sure how much more of this I’m going to do. It depends on the artist, I suppose because, as I mentioned recently with the deaths of Jeff Beck and then Rob Bachman of BTO fame, it’s just our reality. So many of these artists are in their 70s and 80s now and inevitability looms.
    1. The Byrds, Everybody’s Been Burned . . . A haunting, jazz-influenced song written by Crosby, from The Byrds’ 1967 album Younger Than Yesterday.
    1. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Lee Shore . . . Originally recorded in 1969, it first came out on CSNY’s 1971 live album 4 Way Street but vocal overdubs were done in 1991 when this version appeared on that year’s CSN box set.

       

    2. Crosby, Stills & Nash, Shadow Captain . . . Sublime soft rock from 1977’s CSN album (not to be confused with the later box set)
    1. Crosby, Stills & Nash, In My Dreams . . . And another, beautiful acoustic piece from 1977’s CSN. Sad that he died, of course, but if it prompted me – and many – getting back into listening to, and playing, Crosby’s material, what better legacy can you leave?
    1. Crosby, Stills & Nash, Yours And Mine . . . One of those cool, smooth sort of jazzy, hypnotic tunes I tend not to be able to resist. It’s from the 1990 album Live It Up. Branford Marsalis delivers some sweet saxophone.
    1. David Crosby, Drive My Car . . . Not to be confused with The Beatles song. Originally released on Crosby’s 1989 album Oh Yes I Can, this is a previously unreleased version of the bluesy cut, recorded in 1978 but not released until the 1991 CSN box set.
    1. Deep Purple, Vavoom: Ted The Mechanic . . . One of my favorites from the excellent Purpendicular album. Released in 1996, it was the first with guitarist Steve Morse replacing Ritchie Blackmore. Morse was with Purple for eight studio albums but left the band in July, 2022 due to the illness of his wife Janine.
    1. ZZ Top, Manic Mechanic . . . I’ve always loved this interesting, fun track from 1979’s Deguello album. I used to have fun ‘playing’ it with my two then young boys in our air guitar band. One of the boys wound up becoming a good guitarist, outside his day job. And, in researching the track and album over time, I learned something about pitch shifting, a sound recording technique used mostly on vocals over the years in music and cartoons like Tweety, Daffy Duck, Alvin and the Chipmunks and, more recently, South Park. It’s interesting reading.
    1. David Bowie, Drive-In Saturday . . . “His name was always Buddy’ and assorted other lyrics including references to Mick Jagger, the model Twiggy (dating myself, or Bowie did but she was still current then) and Carl Jung, from Bowie’s Aladdin Sane album, 1973.
    1. Moby Grape, Sitting By The Window . . . Beautiful track by the San Francisco rock/psychedelic band, from their 1967 debut album. Never as commercially successful as their contemporaries like the Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead and others, in part due to management issues, they nevertheless released some impressive music. Still around, too, original surviving members playing occasional live shows.
    1. Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Temptation . . . Best known for I Put A Spell On You, Hawkins’ theatrical performances were a big influence on artists such as Alice Cooper who in turn influenced other artists down the line. Another of his typically spooky tracks, I can’t be certain but who knows, this standard, first recorded by Bing Crosby in 1933 and done by Hawkins in 1958, may have influenced the tune used in the scene with the dancing Orion green-skinned slave girl in the original Star Trek pilot episode, The Cage, produced in 1964.
    1. Jethro Tull, She Said She Was A Dancer . . . Bluesy song, Cold War-era fun lyrics from Tull’s 1987 Crest of a Knave album. Excellent album, excellent tour, I saw the Toronto show.
    1. Afro Celt Soundsystem with Robert Plant, Life Begin Again . . .Compilations sometimes get a bad rap and I get it, people complain about what’s on or not on them, etc. and unless you’re content with just the hits, you don’t get the true flavor of an artist unless you have the original studio records. But a well-thought out compilation can be rewarding. Like Robert Plant’s 2003 2-CD release, Sixty Six To Timbuktu. It features most of his solo hits to that point but also rarities including early, pre-Led Zeppelin solo stuff like covers of well known songs like Hey Joe, made famous by Jimi Hendrix and Buffalo Springfield’s For What It’s Worth. Not to mention interesting stuff like this song the ever-experimental Plant did in 2001 with Afro Celt Soundsystem. It’s a British group fusing electronic music with traditional Gaelic and West African music. It’s a wonderful creative stew I’d not have been aware of but for the Plant compilation.
    1. Carla Olson & Mick Taylor, Winter . . . Extended rendition of the great Rolling Stones track from Goats Head Soup, the former Stones’ guitarist Taylor teaming up with Olson, the Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter/guitarist.
    1. Sass Jordan, Leaving Trunk . . . From Rebel Moon Blues, released in 2020. It’s the first of Jordan’s now two blues covers albums, the second being 2022’s Bitches Blues. They’re terrific albums; Jordan’s muscular, earthy voice a perfect fit for the material.
    1. Talking Heads, What A Day That Was (live, from Stop Making Sense) . . . Propulsive track from the 1984 live album soundtrack to the concert film of the same name. The album, originally nine songs in length, was re-released in a 16-song package in 1999.

Listen For Smooth Contemporary QUINTE JAZZ

Saturday January 21 9 AM
After broadcast on SoundCloud
https://soundcloud.com/user-163878073/sets/quinte-jazz

Tape Five Duesenberg THE ROARING 2020’S 2019 tapefive.com
Centric Don’t Mind LOVE RECEIVED 2022 www.iamcentric.com/about
Knight Hammer Beyond The Vista SINGLE 2022 www.knighthammermusic.com
🍁Curtis Dayne For You TIME CARIB REMIX 2022 www.facebook.com/curtisdayne1
Herbie Hancock Vein Melter HEAD HUNTERS 1992 herbiehancock.com
🍁 Winnipeg Jazz Orchestra Homenaje VOICES A MUSICAL HERITAGE 2022 www.winnipegjazzorchestra.com
Inusa Dawunda Time Out TROPICAL EASE 2022 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inusa_Dawuda
Claudia Camapgnol Make Me Believe RIGHT NOW 2022
www.claudiacampagnol.com
🍁 Alex Bird Ewen Farncombe Nightmare Grooves SONGWRITER 2022 alexbird.net/index-home
Andreaus Hourdakis Craftsman UNDERWORLD 2020 andreashourdakis.bandcamp.com/album/underworld
Steve Baxter Bay Bridge RUNNING LATE 2022 jazzinfo.org/artist/steve-baxter
Dave Kowaleski KC In The Clouds UNDER MOJAVE MOON 2022 davekowaleski.com

So Old It’s New ‘2’ set list for Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023 – on air 7-9 am ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list.

  1. Peter Gabriel, Intruder
  2. April Wine, Before The Dawn
  3. Pink Floyd, Alan’s Psychedelic Breakfast
  4. Pink Floyd, One Of These Days
  5. Booker T. & The MGs, Melting Pot
  6. Blondie, The Thin Line
  7. John Mellencamp, Melting Pot
  8. Kansas, Death Of Mother Nature Suite
  9. Supertramp, Cannonball
  10. The Rolling Stones, Saint Of Me
  11. FM, One O’Clock Tomorrow
  12. Bob Dylan, Highlands
  13. Robert Johnson, Stop Breakin’ Down Blues
  14. Neil Young, Ordinary People
  15. Atomic Rooster, People You Can’t Trust
  16. Rod Stewart, Ain’t Love A Bitch
  17. Bachman-Turner Overdrive, It’s Over

    My track-by-track tales:

    1. Peter Gabriel, Intruder . . . Spooky, creepy opening track to the third Gabriel solo album, perhaps best known for the hit Games Without Frontiers. Former Gabriel bandmate in Genesis, Phil Collins, plays drums on several songs on the album, including this one.
    1. April Wine, Before The Dawn . . . A rocker from the band’s 1979 album Harder . . . Faster which yielded the hits I Like To Rock and Say Hello. Meantime, bandleader/chief songwriter/guitarist Myles Goodwyn, the founder and only remaining original member, recently announced he’s retiring from touring, for health reasons, effective the band’s show in Halifax, Nova Scotia on March 2. He’ll continue to write new material and produce any recordings the group might do, although no new studio material has been issued since 2006 and, like most veteran classic rock acts, the band has long relied on its extensive back catalog from the 1970s and ’80s for live shows. Fact is, it’s all most people beyond real diehards, of any band, want to hear. Replacing Goodwyn on guitar and vocals, with his blessing, is Marc Parent. According to a recent report, Parent was in an Ottawa band, Eight Seconds, for two years in the late 1980s; their claim to fame being opening slots for such acts as David Bowie and Duran Duran. Besides Goodwyn’s ongoing involvement, the lone connection to the band’s glory days now is guitarist Brian Greenway, who wrote Before The Dawn and has been with the group since 1978’s First Glance album.
    1. Pink Floyd, Alan’s Psychedelic Breakfast . . . Weird, perhaps, 13-minute epic from the Atom Heart Mother album, late 1970. But it’s far more musical than, say, The Beatles’ Revolution 9 or much of Captain Beefheart’s Trout Mask Replica album. So, amid musical interludes we hear Pink Floyd roadie Alan Styles muttering, pouring milk onto and eating cereal, frying bacon and otherwise rummaging around the kitchen. In any event, I must be getting weirder in my old age because time was I dismissed the cut, but it’s better and more interesting than I first thought. Depends on one’s mood, obviously. And, after all, this is my morning show so . . . time for breakfast. And, you’ll note, as per my typical song title ‘creativity’, The Intruder broke in Before The Dawn and now he’s eating breakfast. Right, that’s enough. Next!
    1. Pink Floyd, One Of These Days . . . Pink Floyd again, next album, in fact, with ‘real’ music. It’s the lead cut from Meddle, 1971 featuring that great bass line recorded by guitarist David Gilmour and bassist Roger Waters, on two different bass guitars. Apparently, Gilmour came up with the original riff on guitar until it was decided to double track bass.
    1. Booker T. & The MGs, Melting Pot . . . This is definitely a ‘melting pot’ show of various genres, featuring several extended pieces, so naturally I’m going with this jazzy, sonic journey of eight minutes’ duration.
    1. Blondie, The Thin Line . . . Another shift, to punk/new wave, on this one that was issued on a 1994 compilation but was recorded as a demo in 1975, a year before the band’s first album was released. It’s since appeared as an extra track on reissues of the self-titled debut.
    1. John Mellencamp, Melting Pot . . . Not the same as the Booker T tune. Straight ahead propulsive rocker, from Mellencamp’s 1991 album Whenever We Wanted. It’s the first release where he went by his given surname, dropping ‘Cougar’.
    1. Kansas, Death Of Mother Nature Suite . . . All the way back to Kansas’ 1974 self-titled debut we go for this self-explanatory prog rocker. I’ve been listening to a lot of Kansas of late, they’ve got a 50th anniverary 3-CD compilation out which has enabled me to catch up on some of the latter day stuff, their most recent studio work coming in 2020, but I decided to go back to the beginning. I’ll get to some of the more recent stuff soon. It’s interesting for me, with Kansas. For the longest time I was someone who essentially listened only to the Point of Know Return album, or compilations, for such hits as Dust In The Wind and Portrait (He Knew), and of course Carry On Wayward Son, the big hit from the previous album, Leftoverture. But those tracks aren’t fully representative of the band’s progressive rock output and as I’ve gotten more into prog rock overall as I’ve aged, Kansas has become more of a go-to band for me
    1. Supertramp, Cannonball . . . This was the single, and fairly successful, top 30, from Brother Where You Bound – the 1985 album that was the first for the band following the departure of Roger Hodgson, leaving the group’s other key songwriter, Rick Davies, in charge, although the commercial success for both factions soon declined.
    1. The Rolling Stones, Saint Of Me . . . No Keith Richards on this one. It’s Ronnie Wood and Waddy Wachtel – session man to the stars (like Warren Zevon, Linda Ronstadt etc.) and Richards’ bandmate in his X-Pensive Winos group – teaming up on guitars from this excellent tune from 1997’s Bridges To Babylon album. It was a single, but like most new output from veteran classic rock bands was relatively ignored except for big fans of the band, like me. It made No. 26 in the UK and No. 94 on the US Billboard chart. Had it been released during the 1970s I think it would have been a bigger hit, but such is likely true of more recent songs by many so-called classic rock bands. Which is why I try to play them on the show. Old bands, old tracks, old bands, their new stuff if they’re still releasing any, is my mantra.
    1. FM, One O’Clock Tomorrow . . . Great tune from the Canadian prog rockers featuring Nash The Slash, who later went solo. It’s from Black Noise, the science fiction-themed 1978 album that produced the Star Trek-influenced hit Phasors On Stun.
    1. Bob Dylan, Highlands . . . Big Dylan fans like me are eagerly awaiting this coming Friday, Jan. 27 which is the release date for Volume 17 of Dylan’s ongoing Bootleg Series of releases featuring outtakes, live cuts, demos and so on from the various album recording sessions and tours over his long career. Volume 17, titled Fragments, focuses on his excellent 1997 return to form album, Time Out Of Mind. Highlands is a 16-minute epic on that album, never dull, flows along on great lyrics, a movie script set to music, essentially. A masterpiece.
    1. Robert Johnson, Stop Breakin’ Down Blues . . . From 1937 from one of the fathers of the blues, of course. A track covered by, among others, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and, more recently, The White Stripes. Johnson’s contribution to and influence on popular music can’t be overstated. A passage from the wonderfully-written liner notes to the 2004 reissue of King Of The Delta Blues Singers, Volume 2, by the late music historian Pete Welding I think nails it. “What is remarkable about his music is that, unlike blues rooted in the experiences and private vision of its writer, Johnson’s songs attain universality. Despite whatever relevance they might have as fragments of his autobiography, his blues – by virtue of the strength and directness of their language, the sharpness and richness of his poetic vision, and the telling statements they make about the human condition – speak to us eloquently and movingly.”
    1. Neil Young, Ordinary People . . . In Highlands, Dylan mentions he’s listening to Neil Young. So, I figured I’d have Neil go Bob two minutes better in this 18-minute track. It’s a different sort of song, not as spare, heavier in spots given some members of Crazy Horse play on it, and fueled by horns. But, like the Dylan song, it flows, never boring, another great story. It’s from Young’s 2007 album Chrome Dreams II. There was a Chrome Dreams album, in 1977 but it was unreleased although many of its songs – Star of Bethlehem, Like A Hurricane, Sedan Delivery and Powderfinger, among them – have been issued on various Young albums since. Hitchhiker, Young’s 2017 album, finally collected a few of them on one record. Further to do with Young: his sometime collaborator in Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, David Crosby, died Thursday at age 81 as I was putting the show together. I’ll likely play something in tribute to him, solo, Byrds, CSN or CSN & Y or in some combination thereof, on Monday’s show.
    1. Atomic Rooster, People You Can’t Trust . . . From the Made In England album, 1972. It saw the prog band moving in a more soul/funk direction. Chris Farlowe, the band’s new singer at the time, had a big influence on the sound. He’s probably best known for having a No. 1 UK hit with the Stones’ Out Of Time in 1966.
    1. Rod Stewart, Ain’t Love A Bitch . . . Sometimes, it can be. A top 20 soft rock hit from 1978’s Blondes Have More Fun album, best known for Stewart’s No. 1 disco hit, Do Ya Think I’m Sexy? That song, very catchy of course, nevertheless was divisive for many fans and critics and marked the beginning of my losing interest in what Stewart was doing, although I hung around for a couple more albums and do like and have played on the show the song Passion, from his 1980 album Foolish Behaviour.

       

    2. Bachman-Turner Overdrive, It’s Over . . . And so it is over, the show, I mean, with this one from BTO’s Head On album. Until Monday . . .

CKMS Community Connections for 13 January 2023 with Tamara Lorincz of Canadian Voice of Women for Peace and Stuart Ross of World Beyond War

Show Notes

Tamara Lorincz

Stuart Ross at the microphone  in the CKMS-FM studio
Stuart Ross

Bob Jonkman talks with Tamara Lorincz, who’s involved with a number of Peace and Social Justice organizations, and Stuart Ross from World Beyond War.

On last week’s CKMS Community Connections I spoke with Tamara and Stuart briefly at the “No F35 Fighter Jets” rally, but there was so much else to talk about that Tamara and Stuart came to the studio for a longer conversation.

The interview starts at 3m20s.

Tamara Lorincz:

Tamara Lorincz previously appeared on CKMS Community Connections for 20 January 2020.

Canadian Voice of Women for Peace:

World BEYOND War:

Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom (WILPF):

No Fighter Jets Coalition:

Sign the Parliamentary petition to: Study the financial, climate, environmental, and social costs of the F35 fighter jets; Make public the results of that study; and Cancel the planned purchase of F35 fighter jets and invest in climate action and the well-being of Canadians: e-4217 : Petition to the House of Commons

An earlier Parliamentary petition endorsed by the No Fighter Jets Coalition was presented by the Hon. Bardish Chagger, MP for Waterloo: e-3821 (National defence and military operations) to which members of the government have responded.

Canada-Wide Peace and Justice Network:

Podcast

Download: ckms-community-connections-2023-01-13-episode109.mp3 (53.7 MB, 55m55s, episode 109)

Index

Time Title Album Artist
0m00s Theme for CKMS Community Connections ccc CKMS Sunflower logo (yellow petals surrounding a black centre with white wavies all on a teal background)
CKMS Community Connections
Steve Todd
0m57s The Place I Leave Behind Cameronoise | Racing To The Next Red Light (four coloured panels showing the same B&W image of a Vespa scooter, "Cameronoise" in the centre with red-on-yellow text and the album name at the bottom in yellow on red text.
Racing To The Next Red Light
Cameronoise
3m09s Stuart Ross tells us how he became involved with World Beyond War. Tamara Lorincz tells us of several other organizations that promote peace and non-violence.
9m52s Talking about the F35 fighter jet purchase by the Canadian government. Discussing the expense, the carbon emissions, other pollutants in the fuel, stolen Indigenous lands for airforce bases, and the trauma and chronic disease brought to these communities from the effects of fighter jet emissions. Militaries are responsible for a 5% of the total carbon emissions across the world, and the United States military is the largest consumer of fossil fuels on the planet. In Canada, the Department of National Defense accounts for 61% of all federal government emissions. There is no plan to offset the emissions from military vehicles and operations. We need to talk about demilitarization for decarbonization. The F35s are not defense armament, but attack fighters. And they are seriously flawed: They only have a range of 2,200km, they can’t fly across the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans, or even across Canada, without flying alongside a tanker. And so Canada will not just be purchasing fighter jets, they will also be purchasing a fleet of strategic tankers to supply these fighter jets. And also runways, hangars, and fuel tanks in the Arctic. Instead of this, Canadians need affordable housing, and health care, and education, and public transit. And yet, these F35s are well known to have many technical flaws, but Canada will not own any of the software or repair manuals.
25m48s The purchase has already been approved; what can we do to reverse this? Call, e-mail, mail, or meet your member of Parliament. Postage to MPs is free. Sign the Parliamentary petition. Check https://nofighterjets.ca/ and read the report Soaring: The Harms And Risks Of Fighter Jets And Why Canada Must Not Buy A New Fleet (PDF, 1.41 MB) which compiles all the problems with the F35 fighter jet.
27m24s Bob introduces the next song, No To NATO by Mistahi, a musician from Winnipeg (not Edmonton).
27m39s No To NATO (Black and white photo of Mistahi Corgill sitting at tympani drums with mics on mic stands in the foreground)
(YouTube)
Mistahi
31m19s Tamara gives some context for No To NATO, including the clips from speeches by veterans from the war in Afghanistan. Tamara encourages us to view the video on YouTube: “No NATO, No War”: U.S. Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan Return War Medals at NATO Summit. Stuart recommends a film Soldiers Without Guns. Tamara provides background information on NATO, a U.S. let military alliance that has launched illegal wars in Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, and Libya; its role in provoking the war in Ukraine, and its attempts at globalizing conflict in Asia. NATO is the greatest threat to peace in the world. Tamara explains the situation of Sweden, and especially Finland experiencing pressure to join NATO, even though Finnish citizens are opposed. Tamara says that if we want to succeed on peace, to succeed on the climate crisis and the Sustainable Development Goals then we need to work collaboratively and co-operatively with Russia and with China. Tamara urges people to read Stephen Cohen’s book War with Russia? The south-east region of Ukraine is the Donbas, a dominant Russian-speaking minority, who held a referendum to say they want to be part of Russia. NATO-backed forces have been shelling and killing Donbas civilians, yet this is something people don’t hear in the mainstream media. If NATO countries had respected the Minsk agreements, giving autonomy within Ukraine for the Donbas region to end the violence against the Russian speaking minority, then this Russia-Ukraine war would never have happened. Tamara wants to see political parties and elected officials to call for an inquiry, and to stop sending weapons, and to support peace and a political resolution.
47m40s What can be done? People can find out what the peace movement is doing in Canada at https://peaceandjusticenetwork.ca/. They are planning an international weekend of action from 24-26 February 2023 to rally in the streets and public squares, to contact their elected representatives, and they will be holding webinars on true nature of the Russia-Ukraine conflict and the F35 fighter jet purchase. Also check the World Beyond War website.

We need peace for a livable planet, and we need peace for a positive happy future for out children and future generations. Stuart hopes that the millions of peace and environmental organizations can get together and have a solid, large voice in stopping this war in Ukraine.

51m33s Bob gives the end credits
52m15s Killer Drones (Drums) (Black and white photo of Mistahi Corgill sitting at tympani drums with mics on mic stands in the foreground)
(YouTube)
Mistahi

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Friday from 3:00pm to 4:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

CKMS logo with wavies coming out the sidesSubscribe to the CKMS Community Connections podcast!

CKMS | 102.7 FM | Radio Waterloo | Community ConnectionsSee all CKMS Community Connections shows!

Bonus Video

YouTube: CKMS Community Connections for 13 January 2023

Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2023 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

From the Void #29 – January 17 2023

Welcome to Episode 29 of From the Void – CKMS’ Experimental Music Show

Tonight will feature Mike Patton,  john Zorn, Secret Chiefs 3, Estradashpere, Orange Tulip Conspiracy, Atomic Ape, Free Salamander Exhibit, Boris and Noxagt.

ALSO!!! I released  ANOTHER new album. Eye, Robot Vol. 1 Spotify, You Tube and Bandcamp or where ever you stream your music!

Melt with me in the Void again this week…

Subscribe to the Podcast

Full episodes to enjoy at your leisure https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1–fLGsdUzW5O_9sK_Bzt9fBvBW-GWKBG?usp=sharing

My Music https://deafbydesign.ca/music

See you in the Void!

 

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Jan. 16, 2023 – on air 8-10 pm ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list

  1. Bachman-Turner Overdrive, Not Fragile
  2. Aerosmith, Sick As A Dog
  3. Creedence Clearwater Revival, Feelin’ Blue
  4. Keith Richards, Will But You Won’t
  5. Jethro Tull, Hunting Girl
  6. Fleetwood Mac, Hypnotized
  7. Tom Cochrane, Just Like Ali
  8. Wilson Pickett, Hey Jude
  9. The Allman Brothers Band, Rockin’ Horse
  10. Patti Smith, Midnight Rider
  11. Santana, Anywhere You Want To Go
  12. Dire Straits, Once Upon A Time In The West
  13. R.E.M., How The West Was Won And Where It Got Us
  14. Little Feat, Mercenary Territory
  15. Colin James, Into The Mystic
  16. Van Morrison, A Sense Of Wonder
  17. The Beatles, You Won’t See Me
  18. Linda Ronstadt, I Won’t Be Hangin’ ‘Round
  19. Paice, Ashton, Lord, Remember The Good Times
  20. Lou Reed, There Is No Time
  21. ZZ Top, Neighbor, Neighbor
  22. Spirit, Topanga Windows
  23. Pete Townshend, Exquisitely Bored
  24. Neil Young and Crazy Horse, Surfer Joe and Moe The Sleaze
  25. Tony Joe White, Even Trolls Love Rock and Roll
  26. The Doors, Moonlight Drive

    My track-by-track tales:

    1. Bachman-Turner Overdrive, Not Fragile . . . Title cut from the Canadian band’s 1974 album to honor the recent passing of BTO drummer Rob Bachman, age 69. Sadly, this obviously will continue to happen, as so many classic rockers are now well past official senior citizen age. Heavy rock lyric – ‘you ask do we play heavy music well are thunderheads just another cloud, we do’ – and, as usual, most of the best BTO songs, in my opinion, were sung by C.F. (Fred) Turner.
    1. Aerosmith, Sick As A Dog . . . From Rocks, one of my favorite Aerosmith albums. Full of great songs, especially deep cuts – the true test of an album – like this one, Nobody’s Fault (arguably my favorite Aerosmith tune, certainly among their deep cuts, but I resisted playing it yet again), etc.
    1. Creedence Clearwater Revival, Feelin’ Blue . . . Bluesy jam tune from Willie and The Poor Boys, the band’s third – third! – album release in the calendar year of 1969. All of them – Bayou Country, Green River and Poor Boys – were excellent and full of hits like Proud Mary, Bad Moon Rising, Down on the Corner and Fortunate Son, just to name four among the many more hits/well known CCR tracks. Amazing songwriter, John Fogerty, from the hits to the deep cuts.
    1. Keith Richards, Will But You Won’t . . . The distinctive riffology of the, er, so-called Human Riff. From his second of three, to date, solo albums, 1992’s Main Offender.
    1. Jethro Tull, Hunting Girl . . . Speaking of riffs, I can never get enough of the descending Martin Barre riff on this one, from Songs From The Wood. And that’s just one facet of this great song.
    1. Fleetwood Mac, Hypnotized . . . It was a tossup between two of my favorite, and somewhat similar, Bob Welch-era Mac cuts last Monday. I chose Bermuda Triangle, from the 1974 album Heroes Are Hard To Find album. And I almost played Hypnotized, as well, but decided against doubling up in the same show. So, here it is, from Mystery To Me, in 1973. Hey, that rhymes. OK, I admit it, did it on purpose.
    1. Tom Cochrane, Just Like Ali . . . Another from the ‘I couldn’t decide between two songs from the same artist’ file. This past Saturday, I went with Cochrane’s Willie Dixon Said, and promised to soon play a similar song of his, one mentioning the late great heavyweight champion boxer. Voila!
    1. Wilson Pickett, Hey Jude . . . Duane Allman on guitar to start a mini-Allman Brothers-oriented set.
    1. The Allman Brothers Band, Rockin’ Horse . . . From the last studio album the band recorded, 2003’s Hittin’ The Note and an excellent album it is. Dickey Betts had been booted from the band due to substance/alcohol abuse (the other members had cleaned up by then), so the guitar tandem was Warren Haynes, in his second go-round with the group, and young gun Derek Trucks, who joined the Allmans in 1999 and has since achieved his own deserved fame alongside his wife Susan in the Tedeschi Trucks Band, formed in 2010. Derek is the nephew of the late Allman Brothers Band drummer Butch Trucks.
    1. Patti Smith, Midnight Rider . . . Back I go to the Twelve album, Smith’s 2007 covers release. It’s terrific and includes songs by Jimi Hendrix (Are You Experienced), the Stones (Gimme Shelter), Beatles (Within You Without You), Tears For Fears (Everybody Wants To Rule The World), Nirvana (Smells Like Teen Spirit) among others, some of which I’ve played before on the show. Eventually, I imagine, I’ll get to all 12.
    1. Santana, Anywhere You Want To Go . . . From IV, the 2016 reunion album featuring most of the original Santana band that produced the first three albums in the early 1970s. Naturally, it sounds just like those amazing records.
    1. Dire Straits, Once Upon A Time In The West . . . Opening cut to Communique, the second Dire Straits album, released in 1979. Typically bluesy, reliable rock from the Mark Knopfler-led band. Some people think it’s an homage to the Sergio Leone western. Lyrically I don’t really see it, at least on the surface, but if you go to various ‘songfact’ sites, there are interesting discussions about it.
    1. R.E.M., How The West Was Won And Where It Got Us . . . I just had to play this one after the Dire Straits tune. They’re actually somewhat similar: bluesy, hypnotic, great. It’s from the 1996 album New Adventures In Hi-Fi.
    1. Little Feat, Mercenary Territory . . . The review site allmusic describes this track as ‘sublime’. I agree. It’s from The Last Record Album. It wasn’t the band’s last record – the title (and cover art) actually alludes to the 1971 movie The Last Picture Show.
    1. Colin James, Into The Mystic . . . Good cover of the Van Morrison classic by the Canadian blues rocker. It’s from his 2005 album Limelight. If you go to the track on YouTube, some suggest it’s better than the original to which I would respectfully say, ‘no’. It’s good but, sorry, nobody’s going to match Van’s original. So why didn’t I play Van’s version? Because I’ve played it too recently, so figured I’d give James a spin.
    1. Van Morrison, A Sense Of Wonder . . . And here’s Van The Man himself, with the beautiful title track from his 1985 album.
    1. The Beatles, You Won’t See Me . . . I’ve been digging into Rubber Soul a fair bit recently when I play The Beatles. In fact, I may have played this too recently, can’t keep track and been too lazy to check. In any event, Rubber Soul is a great album, as are they all by the Fab Four.
    1. Linda Ronstadt, I Won’t Be Hangin’ ‘Round . . . From Ronstadt’s self-titled 1972 album, her third studio release which was significant as it brought together future members of the Eagles. Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Randy Meisner and Bernie Leadon all played on the album, after which they formed the Eagles.
    1. Paice, Ashton, Lord, Remember The Good Times . . . From the short-lived project featuring singer Tony Ashton along with Deep Purple drummer Ian Paice and keyboard player Jon Lord, resulting in the excellent Malice in Wonderland album released in 1977. Many of the songs, rockers most of them, also have an infectiously effective funky feel, like this one. This collaboration beat Nazareth to the album title by three years, Nazareth using the title for their 1980 release that featured the hit Holiday.
    1. Lou Reed, There Is No Time . . . A good rocker from the New York album. The year 1989 was a pretty good one for longtime classic rock artists. Among the other solid albums released that year were Eric Clapton’s Journeyman, Neil Young’s Freedom, Bob Dylan’s No Mercy and Steel Wheels by The Rolling Stones.
    1. ZZ Top, Neighbor, Neighbor . . . From the first album, titled – wait for it, ZZ Top’s First Album. According to guitarist Billy Gibbons, the album was so named because the band wanted people to know there’d be more coming. And, of course, there was.
    1. Spirit, Topanga Windows . . . Folky psychedelia from the first Taurus album, 1968. Topanga is a community in western Los Angeles County, where Taurus band member Randy California lived.
    1. Pete Townshend, Exquisitely Bored . . . In my opinion, the two best songs on Townshend’s 1982 album All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes weren’t issued as singles. They are this track, my favorite from the record, and The Sea Refuses No River, the latter of which has found a righful place on some Townshend compilations. The actual singles? Face Dances Pt. 2 and Uniforms. I don’t get it, either.
    1. Neil Young and Crazy Horse, Surfer Joe and Moe The Sleaze . . . Love the title, love the song, love the grungry hard rock 1981 album from which it came, Re-ac-tor, even though critics didn’t. Eff ’em.
    1. Tony Joe White, Even Trolls Love Rock and Roll . . . From the swamp rocker, known as the Swamp Fox and best known for the song Polk Salad Annie, also done by Elvis Presley. Trolls was issued as a single in 1972. Didn’t chart. Ridiculous.
    1. The Doors, Moonlight Drive . . . B-side to the Love Me Two Times single from The Doors’ 1967 album Strange Days. A well-known track, as it’s appeared on various Doors’ compilations.

So Old It’s New ‘2’ Jeff Beck (RIP)-heavy set list for Saturday, Jan. 14, 2023 – on air 7-9 am ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list.

  1. Muddy Waters, All Aboard (from Fathers and Sons featuring Otis Spann, Mike Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield, Donald ‘Duck’ Dunn, Sam Lay and Buddy Miles)
  2. The Chieftains with The Rolling Stones, The Rocky Road To Dublin
  3. The Rolling Stones, Surprise, Surprise
  4. James Brown, I’ll Go Crazy (from Live at The Apollo)
  5. Tom Cochrane, Willie Dixon Said
  6. Jeff Beck, Beck’s Bolero (from Truth)
  7. Jeff Beck, Diamond Dust (from Blow By Blow)
  8. Jeff Beck, Morning Dew (from Truth)
  9. Jeff Beck Group, Plynth (Water Down The Drain) (from Beck-ola)
  10. Jeff Beck, Wild Thing (UK-only single, 1986, Beck lead vocals)
  11. Split Enz, What’s The Matter With You
  12. Deep Purple, Strange King Of Woman (live, from Made in Japan)
  13. Bruce Hornsby, Talk Of The Town
  14. Social Distortion, I Was Wrong
  15. Carole King, Corazon
  16. Warren Zevon, The Sin (live, from Stand In The Fire)
  17. Joe Jackson, Throw It Away
  18. The Yardbirds, Happenings Ten Years Time Ago (Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page on guitars)
  19. Jeff Beck, Rock My Plimsoul (from Truth)
  20. Jeff Beck, Freeway Jam (from Jeff Beck with The Jan Hammer Group Live)
  21. Jeff Beck, Big Block (from Guitar Shop)
  22. Beck, Bogert, Appice, Jizz Whizz (previously unreleased track, recorded 1973, issued on Beckology box set, 1991)
  23. Jeff Beck Group, Going Down (from Jeff Beck Group ‘orange’ album)
  24. Jeff Beck, Gets Us All In The End (from Flash)
  25. The Band, (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes (live, from Rock Of Ages)My track-by-track tales:
    1. Muddy Waters, All Aboard (from Fathers and Sons featuring Otis Spann, Mike Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield, Donald ‘Duck’ Dunn, Sam Lay and Buddy Miles) . . . Not much more to say beyond my list of who plays on Muddy’s 1969 album, other than it’s great. It was wonderful how, as an elder statesman of the blues by then, Muddy’s ‘sons’ flocked to help him out on albums, including as the decade of the 1970s progressed, Johnny Winter who played on and produced three late period Muddy albums plus the fabulous Muddy ‘Mississippi’ Waters live record.
    1. The Chieftains with The Rolling Stones, The Rocky Road To Dublin . . . Listen closely and you’ll hear the Stones sneak a little snippet of the Satisfaction riff into this 19th century traditional covered by the Irish band. It’s from 1995’s The Long Black Veil album, a collaborative effort that, besides the Stones, featured Mick Jagger on another track, Marianne Faithfull, Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits fame, Sinead O’Connor, Sting, Tom Jones and Van Morrison.
    1. The Rolling Stones, Surprise, Surprise . . . I always play the Stones, my favorite band, my show, my rules…although I wasn’t going to necessarily do that once I got the Saturday morning gig in addition to my longtime Monday show. But I can’t help myself. Here are the rules, if anyone cares. Every Monday there’s a Stones’ track, or something Stones-related, from what I call Stones, Inc. ie solo material from any band member or associate, past and present. Saturdays: I’m not committed (although I probably should be) to the Stones in terms of my set list but…here they are again. Anyway, I was of two minds for Saturday’s show. This track, Surprise, Surprise, an early, up-tempo number from 1965 I’ve always liked. Or, another early Stones’ song, The Spider and The Fly but done up for the 1995 semi-acoustic live album Stripped. In the end, I chose Surprise, Surprise because I thought it fit with me playing a Chieftains track which may not be so unusual in that I’m into all forms of music but perhaps unusual given my usual fare on the show. But of course, the random element was the Stones’ participation. And enough about that, time to move on to the next song. Thank Christ, I hear the chorus.
    1. James Brown, I’ll Go Crazy (from Live at The Apollo) . . . Short, sweet, kick butt stuff from the “Hardest Working Man In Show Business’, the “Godfather of Soul’ and he who went by assorted other nicknames, via one of the greatest live albums of all time. It was recorded in late 1962 in Harlem and released in 1963. There wound up being four ‘live at the Apollo’ albums – Vol II in 1968, Revolution Of The Mind: Live At The Apollo Vol. III, from 1971 and Live At The Apollo 1995, the last live album Brown recorded before his death in 2006. All are excellent, typically high-energy James Brown, to me not much to choose between them musically, because as many artists repeatedly prove, as they age they can still ‘bring it’. But the original remains arguably definitive as a landmark album that cemented Brown’s reputation critically and commercially.
    1. Tom Cochrane, Willie Dixon Said . . . I like a lot of Tom Cochrane’s work including his days in Red Rider, the obvious hits, Big League, Life Is A Highway, the Red Rider stuff like Lunatic Fringe, Light In The Tunnel/Human Race, Napoleon Sheds His Skin, the latter three of which I’ve played over time on the show. As for this Willie Dixon-themed tune, I must admit that, years ago, when you had to buy music, I bought Cochrane’s Xray Sierra album specifically for this cut in honor of one of the blues greats. Here’s a tease: He’s got another, similar, great one, about boxer Muhammad Ali. I played it long ago. I’ll play it again soon.
    1. Jeff Beck, Beck’s Bolero (from Truth) . . . Interesting track in terms of songwriting. It’s always credited to Jimmy Page but if you read up on it, Beck claimed credit too, but never apparently got one. Wouldn’t be the first time Jimmy Page was involved in a songwriting controversy yet somehow he and Beck remained friends, apparently. Great track, in any event, featuring a supergroup – Beck, Page, future Zep bassist/keyboard player John Paul Jones and The Who’s drummer Keith Moon. Beck opens with it on the Live At Ronnie Scott’s album/DVD/Blu-ray and streaming, also on YouTube, a concert worth checking out.
    1. Jeff Beck, Diamond Dust (from Blow By Blow) . . . Beautiful stuff from a terrific album.
    1. Jeff Beck, Morning Dew (from Truth) . . . A song by Canadian writer Bonnie Dobson covered by so many including Nazareth and the Grateful Dead. Among the covers, I’ve always found it difficult to choose between the Nazareth and Jeff Beck Group versions. But since much of this set is in tribute to the late great Beck, here’s the version from the groundbreaking Truth album, lead vocals of course by Rod Stewart.
    1. Jeff Beck Group, Plynth (Water Down The Drain) (from Beck-ola) . . . Cool stop start sort of track, written by Rod Stewart, Ron Wood and Nicky Hopkins for the second, and last, album by the first incarnation of The Jeff Beck Group.
    1. Jeff Beck, Wild Thing (UK-only single, 1986, Beck lead vocals) . . . If you go back through Jeff Beck’s material dating to the Yardbirds, he could sing as well as play guitar. Maybe not perfectly, maybe not a true vocalist, but not too shabby, actually. This version of The Troggs hit got wider exposure via Beck’s 1991 box set release, Beckology. It’s an amazing 3-CD compilation. So good, in fact, that in tribute to Beck I considered just playing Beckology for Saturday morning or, at least, as much of it as I could squeeze in in two hours. But, I had a show planned already, then adjusted upon the sad news of Beck’s death, for a half-Beck, half other artists set.
    1. Split Enz, What’s The Matter With You . . . Remember these guys? Some of the key members eventually morphed into Crowded House. Split Enz’s big hit was I Got You but I’ve always preferred this track which wasn’t even a single, although it had fairly good airplay at the time, 1980, in Canada, at least.
    2. Deep Purple, Strange King Of Woman (live, from Made in Japan) . . . Total play off the Split Enz track ie what’s the matter with you, you strange kind of woman but of course totally different genres, the hard rock of Purple live vs the pop/new wave of Split Enz. But, it all works in musicland, I say.
    1. Bruce Hornsby, Talk Of The Town . . . Not sure when the last time was, or if there was such a time, that I played Bruce Hornsby. Beyond the two obvious hits he had, way back when, The Way It Is and The Valley Road, he’s an interesting/amazing artist, on his own, in sessions, and on the road in latter day versions of the Grateful Dead. Much respect to artists like him who do what moves them rather than what might bring them commercial success. So, in that sense, he especially belongs in a set largely dedicated to a similar artist, the late great Jeff Beck. Lovely piano as one would expect from Hornsby on a compelling tune about an interracial romance.
    1. Social Distortion, I Was Wrong . . . I got into Social Distortion via this song, from the 1996 album White Light, White Heat, White Trash back when commercial rock radio was still at least occasionally playing new material by relatively new bands, or even new music from longstanding bands. Social Distortion was into their fifth studio album by then, but thankfully I heard it and became a fan. Great lyrics.
    1. Carole King, Corazon . . . Funky, Santana-esque track, something many might not expect from the singer-songwriter who produced the amazing Tapestry album, released in 1971. Corazon is from King’s Fantasy album,  two years after Tapestry. I pulled it from a compilation I bought years ago, The Essential Carole King. It’s a nicely done compilation. The first CD features King as singer/songwriter/performer. The second disc is her songwriting, as done by others including well-known tunes like The Monkees’ Pleasant Valley Sunday and Little Eva’s The Loco-Motion, also done by Grand Funk Railroad.
    2. Warren Zevon, The Sin (live, from Stand In The Fire) . . . To my knowledge, this is the only version available of this song, recorded live in 1980 in West Hollywood, California. It was a new song at the time, debuted live, rock and roll, and there it sits on the Stand In The Fire album. The album was released in 1980 but quickly became hard to find, going out of print, apparently, before I had a chance to buy it. It finally was re-released on CD in 2007. Well worth having/listening to, all available online now of course. But be wary. Online stuff doesn’t always stay there.
    3. Joe Jackson, Throw It Away . . . I played JJ’s A Slow Song last Saturday so I figured I’d go with one of his fast ones this week. Just to show him that he, too, often turned music into the ‘savage beast’ he referenced in A Slow Song. And that’s great. Killer stuff from his debut, Look Sharp!
    1. The Yardbirds, Happenings Ten Years Time Ago (Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page on guitars) . . . Back into the late great Jeff Beck we go on this rousing Yardbirds team-up featuring two of that band’s legendary guitarists, the other being Eric Clapton.
    1. Jeff Beck, Rock My Plimsoul (from Truth) . . . It’s hard to find words for the songs on Truth. The album is ridiculously great – a template for so much of the hard, bluesy rock it influenced.
    1. Jeff Beck, Freeway Jam (from Jeff Beck with The Jan Hammer Group Live) . . . This is why Jeff Beck was so great. He stepped out, into other genres, with different musicians, often on his previous tunes, like this one that first appeared on Blow By Blow, while incorporating all of it into who and what he was.
    1. Jeff Beck, Big Block (from Guitar Shop) . . . I always owned it but didn’t fully get into Guitar Shop until I heard a live version of this track on a later Jeff Beck release, Jeff Beck Live + from 2015. So, I went back to the original studio version and, as often happens, was rewarded. Worth the price of admission for the intro alone.
    1. Beck, Bogert, Appice, Jizz Whizz (previously unreleased track, recorded 1973, issued on Beckology box set, 1991) . . . From the early 1970s power trio, Beck and two-thirds of the original Vanilla Fudge, on a previously-unreleased 1973 recording that only saw the light of day on the aforementioned Beckology box.
    1. Jeff Beck Group, Going Down (from Jeff Beck Group ‘orange’ album, 1972) . . . Great cover of the Don Nix classic by the second Jeff Beck Group, this one comprised of Beck, Bobby Tench (vocals), Max Middleton (keyboards), Clive Chaman (bass) and Cozy Powell (drums) as opposed to the original Beck group featuring Rod Stewart on lead vocals and Ronnie Wood on bass.
    1. Jeff Beck, Gets Us All In The End (from Flash) . . . Killer riffology to start the track, which suffers a bit from 1980s overproduction. It was released in 1985 but yet another indication of Beck’s guitar prowess.
    1. The Band, (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes (live, from Rock Of Ages) . . . A friend of mine mentioned he was listening to this album the other night, New Year’s Eve in fact which is when much of the album was recorded as 1971 passed into 1972. So, as always, a thought is planted and I play something. Hanging it up now, until Monday’s show.

From the Void #28 – January 10th 2023

Welcome to Episode 28 of From the Void – CKMS’ Experimental Music Show

Tonight will feature Mike Patton, Can, Faust, Neu!, The Cosmic Jokers, Annexus Quam, AR and Machines and Agitation Free!

ALSO!!! I released a ANOTHER new album. Everything VOL 1! Spotify, You Tube and Bandcamp or where ever you stream your music!

Melt with me in the Void again this week…

Subscribe to the Podcast

Full episodes to enjoy at your leisure https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1–fLGsdUzW5O_9sK_Bzt9fBvBW-GWKBG?usp=sharing

My Music https://deafbydesign.ca/music

See you in the Void!

 

 

Klausterfokken Playlist for January 9th, 2023, 10pm – 12am ET

 
Artist – Song Title
Mason Tikl – Klausterfokken Opener
Katatonia – Birds
Infected Mushroom – Project 100
Head in a Box – Annoying Dance of Nothing
Sikth – Skies of the Millenium Night
Striatum – Karuna
Sleep Token – Chokehold
Daughtry – Separate Ways (Worlds Apart) [feat Lzzy Hale]
Head in a Box – Feel: At Home
Twelve Foot Ninja – Tangled
Sikth – Can’t We All Dream?
David Maxim Micic – Cry
Sleep Token – The Summoning
Striatum – Humanity (feat. Bobby McIntosh)
 

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, January 9, 2023 – on air 8-10 pm ET

My track-by-track tales follow this bare-bones list.

  1. Peter Gabriel, On The Air
  2. Elton John, Funeral For A Friend (Love Lies Bleeding)
  3. Styx, Miss America
  4. Neil Young, Motorcycle Mama
  5. The Rolling Stones, If You Really Want To Be My Friend
  6. Phil Collins, Thru These Walls
  7. Harry Chapin, Taxi
  8. Harry Chapin, Sequel
  9. Marianne Faithfull, Reason To Believe
  10. The White Stripes, One More Cup Of Coffee
  11. Bob Dylan, Sara
  12. Roxy Music, While My Heart Is Still Beating
  13. Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band, No Man’s Land
  14. Fleetwood Mac, Bermuda Triangle
  15. Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, Taxman
  16. Ringo Starr, Back Off Boogaloo
  17. The Flying Burrito Brothers, Lazy Days
  18. Robert Plant/Alison Krauss, Gone Gone Gone (Done Moved On)
  19. The Allman Brothers Band, In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (live, At Fillmore East album version)
  20. The Alan Parsons Project, The Turn Of A Friendly Card (The Turn Of A Friendly Card, Pt. 1/Snake Eyes/The Ace of Swords/Nothing Left To Lose/The Turn Of A Friendly Card, Pt. 2) 

    Set list with my track-by-track tales

    1. Peter Gabriel, On The Air . . . Gabriel’s first four solo albums were all simply called ‘Peter Gabriel’ so they came to be known by their album covers. This is from his second album, the ‘scratch’ record. No big hits but it’s arguably one of his most interesting albums, not least due to the presence of guitarist Robert Fripp, of King Crimson fame, on many of the songs.
    1. Elton John, Funeral For A Friend (Love Lies Bleeding) . . . Classic, epic opener from the Goodbye Yellow Brick Road album. So why didn’t I open with it today? Well, I did open a show with it a few years ago. And I was going to again, but then decided Gabriel’s tune fit better, by title.
    1. Styx, Miss America . . . Not a big Styx fan, one of my younger brothers was so I couldn’t help but know their stuff, and this rocker is one of their best, in my opinion.
    1. Neil Young, Motorcycle Mama . . . From 1978’s Comes A Time, with the late Nicolette Larson sharing lead vocals with Young.
    1. The Rolling Stones, If You Really Want To Be My Friend . . . Lovely ballad from the It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll album, featuring Philadelphia soul crooners Blue Magic on backing vocals.
    1. Phil Collins, Thru These Walls . . . Phil Collins pretty much lost me after his first two solo albums but I like this spooky track from the second album, Hello, I Must Be Going! It was the first single released, albeit only in the UK, where it only managed to make No. 56 on the charts. Much more successful was the album’s second single, the worldwide smash cover of You Can’t Hurry Love, the song made famous by The Supremes.
    1. Harry Chapin, Taxi . . . The story of Harry the cab driver and Sue, his old flame.
    1. Harry Chapin, Sequel . . . Eight years later, in 1980 for his album Sequel, Chapin picks up the story, as they meet again . . . It’s a beautiful pairing of songs, with the touching ending: “I guess it’s a sequel to our story, from the journey ‘tween Heaven and Hell, with half the time thinking of what might have been and half thinkin’ just as well . . . I guess only time will tell.” Chapin, a noted philanthropist, died in a traffic accident in July of 1981, at age 38, on his way to playing at a benefit concert. I remember hearing the report on the radio.
    1. Marianne Faithfull, Reason To Believe . . . Faithfull’s 1967 cover of the 1965 Tim Hardin classic, done by many artists including The Carpenters and Rod Stewart, to great effect, on his 1971 album, Every Picture Tells A Story. The B-side of Stewart’s single version was Maggie May, which radio stations started playing more than the A-side as Maggie May became a huge hit. As for the Faithfull version, her at this point sweet vocals are a sharp contrast to the later world-weary sound of her voice, changed by drug abuse and cigarettes, as it appeared on her big 1979 comeback album, Broken English. It’s like listening to two different artists, and both sound great, suited to the songs.
    1. The White Stripes, One More Cup Of Coffee . . . Cover of one of my favorite Bob Dylan tunes, from his 1976 album, Desire.
    1. Bob Dylan, Sara . . . Speaking of the Desire album . . . Again, inspiration coming from everywhere and anywhere, a friend of mine mentioned he was listening to the album last week, which prompted me to think of One More Cup Of Coffee and others among my favorites from the record. This is one of them, a touching love song to Dylan’s then-estranged wife Sara, who visited the studio when he recorded it, telling her ‘this is for you.” They later reconciled, but finally divorced in 1977.
    1. Roxy Music, While My Heart Is Still Beating . . . Yet another beautiful song from the wonderful Avalon album, a lovely soundscape from start to finish.
    1. Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band, No Man’s Land . . . Haven’t played Seger in a while, and a great one this is, musically and lyrically, from the Against The Wind album. The album wound up knocking Pink Floyd’s The Wall from its No. 1 perch atop the charts.
    1. Fleetwood Mac, Bermuda Triangle . . . Haunting track from the fifth and final album, Heroes Are Hard To Find, of the guitarist/songwriter Bob Welch period of Fleetwood Mac. It’s the middle, arguably underappreciated time between the early, Peter Green-led blues band and the later Stevie Nicks-Lindsey Buckingham commercial behemoth.
    1. Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, Taxman . . . Cover of the Beatles/George Harrison tune, which I played recently, that appeared on Vaughan’s posthumously-released first greatest hits album in 1995. According to the album’s liner notes, the song was done for a never-completed animated film project initiated by Michael Jackson, who owned the publishing rights to The Beatles’ catalog. The record company suggested Vaughan’s band do Taxman, but what band members have described as ‘Howlin’ Wolf Sings The Beatles’ due to the growly vocals, remained unreleased until after Vaughan’s death.
    1. Ringo Starr, Back Off Boogaloo . . . Ringo usually employed outside songwriters, include his fellow Beatles. This is one he wrote himself, inspired by a conversation with Marc Bolan of T-Rex, who used the phrase Ringo wound up taking as inspiration and song title. Among the players on the tune are George Harrison (slide guitar), Gary Wright (keyboards) and longtime Beatles’ associate Klaus Voorman (bass), who appeared on several solo albums by the various members except for Paul McCartney.
    1. The Flying Burrito Brothers, Lazy Days . . . Infectious country/rockabilly toe-tapper written by Gram Parsons.
    1. Robert Plant/Alison Krauss, Gone Gone Gone (Done Moved On) . . . While Jimmy Page continues to spend his time re-remastering and re-releasing Led Zeppelin albums for the billionth time, Robert Plant just gets on with interesting things like the wonderful 2007 collaboration with country/bluegrass artist Krauss that resulted in the Raising Sand album. This is their version of the Everly Brothers song. In 2021, the duo released their second album together, Raise The Roof.
    1. The Allman Brothers Band, In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (live, At Fillmore East album version) . . . One of the band’s finest of many instrumentals written by guitarist Dickey Betts, about a woman he was involved with. Betts used the name of a woman he saw on a headstone in a cemetery as a means of cloaking the real person’s identity.
    1. The Alan Parsons Project, The Turn Of A Friendly Card (The Turn Of A Friendly Card, Pt. 1/Snake Eyes/The Ace of Swords/Nothing Left To Lose/The Turn Of A Friendly Card, Pt. 2) . . . Epic 16-minute track broken down into five individual songs, from the prog band’s 1980 album.