Category Archives: Shows

Posts about shows and programmers.

CKMS News – 2021-07-25 – Continuing to support survivors of sexual assault through pandemic spike

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Host: Sherice Alishaw

CW: This episode features discussion of sexual assault.

Through the pandemic survivors of sexual assault in the Waterloo Region have been increasingly accessing available supports.  

On this episode of CKMS News, we interview Andrea Arthur-Brown, the Director of Services for the Sexual Assault Support Centre Waterloo Region. We discuss what it is that the Sexual Assault Support Centre does, the rise of sexual assault within our region, and the rise in individuals seeking support for sexual assault. We also talk about how we as a community can reduce the instances of sexual assault within our community. 

This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant project and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada and the CKMS Newsroom. 

Check out the archived versions of this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news, and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca

You can follow us on twitter @radiowaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, July 26, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. Murray McLauchlan, Hard Rock Town . . . It’s a deep cuts show but I deviate sometimes. This was a hit and appropriate to a set full of hard rock or at least up-tempo tracks. I also got into a ‘thing’ with song titles about, you’ll see it’s obvious, and couldn’t seem to stop for a while. Whatever, what’s done is done. Good tunes, in any event. Some repeats from fairly recent previous shows I think but again, so be it.
  1. The Beatles, Why Don’t We Do It In The Road? . . . And so starts a sort of topic you’ll see reflected in the song titles of the next several, including another Beatles’ tune.
  1. AC/DC, Givin The Dog A Bone . . . As lead singer Brian Johnson was once quoted as saying, ‘we’re a filthy band.” Applies to the next several tunes, so just listing them, no comment until I pick it up again.
  1. Led Zeppelin, The Lemon Song
  1. Frank Zappa, Dirty Love

     

  2. Dead Kennedys, Too Drunk To Fuck
  1. Ted Nugent, Just What The Doctor Ordered
  1. Graham Parker & The Rumour, Protection . . . Not really what I’m on about with the topic, but the title fits my silly narrative, ha.
  1. The Beatles, Getting Better . . . Were this song released today, it likely would provoke controversy given the lyrics: “I used to be cruel to my woman I beat her…” But, it’s one of my musical favorites from the Sgt. Pepper album.
  1. Metallica, Ain’t My Bitch . . . From the controversial Load album, where fans accused the band of selling out, even more than they were accused of doing on the previous monster hit ‘black’ album. They still sold millions, attracted new fans, and their entire catalog has merit so, relax.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Bitch . . . One of my favorite tunes by my favorite band, and on Mick Jagger’s birthday, to boot. Still going strong at age 78.
  1. Black Sabbath, Digital Bitch . . . From the one and only album the band did, 1983, with Deep Purple lead singer Ian Gillan. A controversial album, but I and many Sabs fans maintain, a good one.
  1. Deep Purple, Lady Double Dealer . . . Good rocker from the Stormbringer album, typically good co-lead vocals by David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes during that period of the band. Love Hughes’ ‘oh baby’ in one of the verses early in the song, just adds a cool element to the track.
  1. Judas Priest, Ram It Down . . . Title cut from the album and just an absolute scorcher.
  1. Blue Oyster Cult, Hot Rails To Hell . . . Great riff on this pulsating track from the Tyranny and Mutation album.
  1. Midnight Oil, Redneck Wonderland . . . Title cut from the almost metallic, somewhat industrial sound of the band’s 1998 album. One of my favorites by the Oils.
  1. Elvis Costello (I Don’t Want To Go To) Chelsea . . . A single that didn’t do well outside the UK, from This Year’s Model in 1978. Likely has become better known over time as it’s been included on many compilation albums.
  1. Motorhead, Speedfreak . . . The song lives up to the title. Typical Motorhead madness, which is a good thing.
  1. Yes, Machine Messiah . . . And now for a total change of direction, to Yes’s 1980 Drama album, a hard-edged offering by the revamped band now (then) featuring imports from The Buggles in singer Trever Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes. Great song, great album.
  1. Golden Earring, Candy’s Going Bad . . . Love the riff on this rocker from Moontan, the album which of course gave the world Radar Love but revealed the band to be SO much more than that song. A wall to wall great album, this song (among just five extended cuts on the record) an indication of that.
  1. The Kinks, 20th Century Man . . . Said it a million times about Muswell Hillbillies, a criminally underappreciated (at least commercially) album that for my money is one of the greatest rock/pop albums ever released by one of the greatest bands ever.
  1. King Crimson, 21st Century Schizoid Man . . . Lead cut, and the heaviest rocker on the brilliant In The Court Of The Crimson King debut album in 1969. It remains my favorite Crimson record.
  1. The Beach Boys, Sloop John B . . . One of the more commercial cuts from Pet Sounds, the highly-acclaimed album that, aside from this and Wouldn’t It Be Nice, took me about seven billion listens to ‘get’ but I do now ‘get’ it and it’s brilliant. Decided to play this one after discussing great ‘summer’ music with a buddy; he was playing the B-52s so that same day I happened to pop a Beach Boys’ compilation into the car player and thought, yeah, I’ll play this one on my next show.
  1. Johnny Winter, Highway 61 Revisited . . . Yet another great Winter cover, this being the studio version of the Bob Dylan track which Winter released on Second Winter, his 1969 album. It’s the song that got me into Winter, I heard it wherever, found the album, bought it and became a Winter fan. Saw him at the 2011 Kitchener Blues Festival, he along with brother Edgar was one of several big names on the bill that year, the others being Gregg Allman and John Mayall. I saw all four, all were great even if by that time, Johnny was in declining health, needing assistance and sitting down through his set, but still smokin’ hot.
  1. Paul McCartney/Wings, Morse Moose And The Grey Goose . . . A fun extended track by Macca, from 1978’s London Town album. Reminds me in some ways, in terms of structure at least, of McCartney’s Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey in that it’s essentially several songs in one.

     

  2. Faces, Had Me A Real Good Time . . . I just know I’ve recently closed a show with this track and I don’t like repeating myself (at least, not too closely together) but what the heck. Occured to me as I was prepping the show, because I always have a good time doing it, and so here it is, from one of the great raunch and roll bands of all.

Virasat Radio

Radio Virasat logoVirasat Radio produced by Virasat Media is a Canadian based media company that was founded in 2011. The company develops and produces South Asian focused current affairs programming for various media including, print, radio, and television broadcast. After a decade in the business, the company is focusing on the creation of new arts and cultural programming.
 
There is growing interest in South Asian culture among young Canadians. Virasat Media recognizes the opportunity of introducing international stars to the Canadian market while simultaneously creating opportunities for new home-grown Canadian Talent. Join us and bring your products and services to one of the most prosperous and fastest growing ethnic communities…
 
Virasat Media’s resourcefulness and its ability to create, produce and broadcast, radio and TV shows has helped it develop a foundation, a network and a set of skills that is invaluable in planning and executing larger scale events.

Our early morning show on CKMS 102.7 FM starts with Morning Prayer followed by today in history. We play Punjabi music produced by Canadian and international artist from the world. Our news producers from Canada and India will keep the community updated with current news in Canada and around the world. In March 2019 we will have the phone lines open for live talk shows.

Virasat Media is the voice of the community. Call/Text/Email.

Virasat Radio airs weekday mornings from 7:00am to 9:00am starting 1 August 2021.

Baljinder Tamber
Producer
Phone: +1-416-451-2222
Web: www.imela.cainfo@imela.ca

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, July 19, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. Chris Isaak, Let’s Have A Party . . . Isaak became well known via his big hit Wicked Game, which to me remains his best song and, released in 1989, is now more than 30 years old! But Isaak’s other material is top-notch; I’m not a major fan but I do like this rocker and much of his other stuff. He does a nice cover of Cheap Trick’s I Want You To Want Me which I almost chose, but thought we’d start the party with this one.
  1. Kenny Rogers and The First Edition, Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) . . . I like and respect Kenny Rogers’ later work that turned him into a superstar but have always gravitated to his two big hit songs – this one and Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town – while with the First Edition, who I remember hosting the show Rollin’ on Canadian TV, early 1970s. I first heard Ruby when my dad, who emigrated from Europe after WW2, played it. He was more into classical and opera but also had a love for American country music so probably liked Ruby due to it being written by Mel Tillis and was curious about the First Edition’s cover. Mel’s version is much more country/rockabilly than the rockier First Edition version.
  1. Ron Wood, Am I Grooving You . . . From Woody’s first solo album, 1974’s I’ve Got My Own Album To Do and a track which quickly became one of my favorites. I always play a Stones’ or Stones-related track on the show, they being my all-time favorite band and I’ve Got My Own Album To Do is a real demonstration of what I like to call Stones Inc. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards appear on it and contributed two songs (Act Together and Sure The One You Need), then-Stone (who Wood replaced) Mick Taylor contributes guitar, bass and synthesizer and it’s truly, beyond the Stones, an all-star cast on the record. Also appearing to varying degrees are George Harrison, David Bowie, Rod Stewart…terrific album.

     

  2. Ten Years After, 50,000 Miles Beneath My Brain . . . TYA is likely most widely known for the immortal version of Goin’ Home from Woodstock and their wonderful single I’d Love To Change The World. But, led by Alvin Lee, such a solid band, great, consistent blues-rock material with some elements of psychedelia as on this one from 1970’s front-to-back solid Cricklewood Green album.
  1. Deep Purple, Shield . . . From The Book of Taliesyn album, the middle one of their first three albums representing the early psychedelic/progressive side of the band before Ian Gillan and Roger Glover replaced original singer Rod Evans and bassist Nick Simper, respectively, in 1970 for the In Rock album. As I’ve often stated, I like every version/lineup of Deep Purple, major fan, but over the years have really dug into the first three albums, which I think are brilliant.
  1. Van Morrison, Tupelo Honey . . . Title cut from his 1972 album. Great stuff, one of my favorite Van The Man tracks. Made No. 35 and 47, respectively, on the Canadian and US singles charts.
  1. Atlanta Rhythm Section, Champagne Jam . . These guys were pretty hot for a while there in the mid- to late 1970s what with great singles like So Into You and Imaginary Lover, which they played when I saw them as one of three opening acts for The Rolling Stones’ July 4, 1978 show at what was then known as Rich Stadium, outside Buffalo, where the NFL’s Bills play. ARS opened with this title cut from their 1978 album which they were touring behind that year. Other acts on that Stones’ bill were Journey and April Wine, but we missed April Wine, dammit, due to our tour bus being stuck in a massive traffic jam heading into the stadium. Fantastic day, though, my first time seeing the Stones.
  1. Emerson, Lake & Powell, Mars, The Bringer Of War . . . Yes, Emerson, Lake & Powell, not Palmer. More on that in a minute. Anyway, a slightly different ELP’s version of the first movement (of seven) from English composer Gustav Holst’s great epic 49-minute orchestral suite The Planets, written between 1914 and 1917. It appeared on the one and only Emerson, Lake & Powell album, in 1986. The band wanted to do a new Emerson, Lake & Palmer album but Palmer was contractually tied up with the band Asia at the time so, after unsuccessfully auditioning a few drummers, they contacted Powell, a friend of Emerson’s, and voila! Fortuitously, given Powell’s surname they could keep the ELP moniker although, according to Wikipedia, the band did approach ‘Phil Pollins’ and ‘Ringo Parr’ before Powell agreed to join. What a diverse artist Cozy Powell was: Metal/hard rock (Black Sabbath, Rainbow, etc.) blues (some work with Peter Green), progressive rock (ELP).
  1. Tipton, Entwistle and Powell, Walls Cave In . . . And here’s Powell in another combo with Glenn Tipton of Judas Priest and John Entwistle of Who fame. This is from the Edge Of The World album released by Tipton in 2006, after his mates had passed, but dating back to sessions he did with Entwistle and Powell between 1994 and 1997 that were intended for Tipton’s 1997 solo album, Baptizm of Fire. According to Tipton’s liner notes, the majority of his work on what became Baptizm of Fire featured Entwistle and Powell. The record company liked the material but suggested the band was too ‘old school’ and that Tipton use younger musicians, which he did on an album that, among other songs, included a cover of the Stones’ Paint It Black. I played Tipton’s cover eons ago on the show and will again, it’s a cool metallic treatment of the Stones’ classic. But Tipton liked the unused material done with Entwistle and Powell and decided to put it together and release it as a tribute to his friends.

     

  2. Moon Martin, Hot Nite In Dallas . . . Remember him, of Rolene fame? And he wrote Bad Case Of Loving You (Doctor Doctor) which Robert Palmer rode to hit status in 1979. Martin was (died in 2020 of natural causes at age 74) really good. Great, usually up tempo rocker stuff. Check out a ‘mix’ of his on YouTube sometime. Oh, real name John David Martin, apparently given the nickname Moon due to the presence of ‘moon’ in many of his lyrics.
  1. Nick Lowe, I Love The Sound Of Breaking Glass . . . What a great artist Nick Lowe is and that thought was reinforced as I was working through his material and reminding myself to play him again/more often, while prepping the show. He came to wide prominence, arguably, with the Labour of Lust album in 1979, which is when and where I discovered him, brilliant album. This is from the preceding record, also great, his first solo effort, Jesus Of Cool, in 1978. The album was re-titled Pure Pop For Now People (a slogan on the original UK release) with a different track listing in the USA. Haven’t been able to find a definite reason but given US religious bullshit I can imagine Jesus Of Cool wouldn’t fly in some of the colonies, as some insult on Jesus. Anyway, great tune from a great artist who was also a member of Brinsley Schwarz, for whom he wrote the song (What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love & Understanding that became a hit for Elvis Costello, Rockpile (with Dave Edmunds) and Little Village (with John Hiatt, Ry Cooder and Jim Keltner). And latter day, Lowe has some terrific rockabilly, countryish, singer songwriter stuff.
  1. The Beatles, Cry Baby Cry . . . Haven’t played the boys in a while, some of their solo work but overdue for a Beatles’ tune. One of my favorites from the white album, such a great record and such great vocals by John Lennon on this one. Plus the cool “Can You Take Me Back” coda sung by Paul McCartney at the end. These guys were ridiculously good.
  1. David Wilcox, God Is On A Bender . . . Given the usual state of the world, yeah, probably. Actually, the world to me is OK. It’s the people in it, me included, that cause problems. Just kidding. Sort of. Maybe. Sometimes. Anyway, nice bluesy fun tune and a nice intro to the next one, by title, at least.
  1. Paul Rodgers, Morning After The Night Before . . . From Rodgers’ solo debut in 1983 after the first, classic original version of Bad Company broke up. He played all instruments on this one, produced the record and it may as well have been another Bad Co. album. Quite good. I had already planned to play this tune but was gratified on Sunday when someone on Twitter asked about albums that were truly ‘solo’ and I put forward this one, to great feedback.
  1. Patti Smith, Are You Experienced . . . from Smith’s covers album, Twelve, released in 2007. This cover of a Hendrix tune goes out to my old pal Gerry Telford with whom, when I played another Smith track recently, I got into a discussion of her work and I recommended he try this album along with what he was recently discovering in her catalog. Did you get it yet, Gerry? 🙂
  1. Concrete Blonde, Walking In London . . . She’s not as well widely known, likely, but I really think Johnette Napolitano is one of the all-time best female rock singers, and singers, period. Sultry, throaty, sexy, powerful, great range, just brilliant. Evidenced, to me, by this title cut from the now defunct band’s 1992 album.
  1. Joe Jackson, Right and Wrong . . . from one of my favorite artist’s Big World album, 1986. About Ronald Reagan, great, typically cutting Jackson lyrics. Could apply at any time, really. I saw the tour promoting this album, first time (of two) I saw JJ. Great show.
  1. Sniff ‘n’ The Tears, Poison Pen Mail . . . These guys are much more than the brilliant hit single Driver’s Seat. Like this song. Usually considered a one-hit wonder and I get it, but try more of their tunes if you’re so inclined and there’s lots more good stuff.
  1. Montrose, Space Station No. 5 . . . From whence Sammy Hagar sprang. Great rocker from the debut, self-titled Montrose album.
  1. Goddo, Anacanapana/So Walk On . . . These ‘have’ to be played together for the transition alone, between the instrumental and into So Walk On. I saw Goddo 5-6 years ago in Cambridge, Ontario in a wonderful reunion with some old childhood friends from Peru. A great show enjoyed by all.
  1. The Allman Brothers Band, Instrumental Illness (live) . . . This extended cut first appeared on what turned out to be the final studio album by the boys, Hittin’ The Note in 2003. Twelve minutes on the album, this is the almost 17-minute version from the great live album by the latter-day band, One Way Out. There is an extended drum solo within but still, what to me has always made the Allmans great is how they can do long tracks, particularly instrumentals, and never bore you.

CKMS News – 2021-07-19 – Cambridge’s Baitul Mosque hatefully ransacked

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Host: Namish Modi

This piece features interviews with Baitul Mosque volunteer Nabeel Rana, Cambridge mayor Kathryn McGarry and Coalition of Muslim Women KW President Sarah Shafiq. 

The mosque in the Galt area of Cambridge was severely vandalized this week in an act of hate, and Rana estimates the damage at about $15,000 to $20,000. 

The vandalism is under investigation by the Waterloo Regional Police.

The Cambridge community has come together to support the mosque while the vandalism comes off the heels of the murder of four members of a Muslim family in London last month.

Radio Waterloo published a piece on the incident in London a few weeks ago, as well.

Update: 1 man has been arrested so far in connection to this incident.


This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

The Gems Of Life Show- Increasing Iron and Hemoglobin Levels

A double show treat today we got 2 different shows today, one with our very own Kitchener Mayor Vrbanovic and the 2nd recording is my own story on how I over came anemia.

Today’s show I share one of my biggest struggles from childhood. I found out about later in my adult life I was anemic, low iron and hemoglobin levels, I was on the iron pills for years, only thing I got from it was constipation.

Until the day I found out the only way to get better is get a blood transfusion to combat my anemia. Was that the only solution? well listen in as I share what I did and how I did it, and in 8 weeks I was for the first time in my entire life had normal blood results, Anemia FREE.

Thank you kindly for listening in.

Please support our YouTube channel, subscribe, like, comment and share so others too can benefit.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLdfinIbTCK8z5Dw0G3emnA/videos

You can also connect with me via email.

fadhwa@thegemsoflife.com

Here’s the video version.

The Gems Of Life Show-In Conversation With Kitchener Mayor Berry Vrbanovic

A double show treat today we got 2 different shows today, one with our very own Kitchener Mayor Vrbanovic and the 2nd recording is my own story on how I over came anemia.

Tune in today at 6pm.

Join in conversation with our very own Kitchener Mayor Vrbanovic.

I really had fun conversing with Mayor Vrbanovic, as he shared his commitment, passion for the community and the contribution,  support our community has seen through the pandemic.

Support our youtube channel, please subscribe, like, comment and share.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLdfinIbTCK8z5Dw0G3emnA

Connect with me via email: fadhwa@thegemsoflife.com

Thank you for tuning in.

Aspire To Inspire

CKMS News – 2021-07-15 – Impacts on tourism from COVID19 and the start of recovery in Waterloo Region

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Host: Namish Modi

This piece features an interview with Explore Waterloo Region CEO Minto Schneider. In the interview, we touch on how hard the tourism sector has been affected throughout the past 17 months and the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Several hospitality and tourism places, like museums and theme parks haven’t been fully open for two summers now. Schneider discusses the importance of Step 3 in Ontario, which begins on July 16, as well as touches on just how important health and safety protocols continue to be. 

Schneider doesn’t have an estimate on financial losses over the last year due to COVID, but imagines it is very high. 

Many businesses were initially upset about Waterloo Region being held in step two of Ontario’s reopening, but further understood the reasoning. The region was held back in the province’s reopening because of a number of Delta variant virus cases in the area. 


This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, July 12, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. J.J. Cale, Rock And Roll Records . . . As some of the comments in the YouTube clip of this song suggest, only thing wrong with J.J. Cale’s music is that most of his songs are too/so short. Like this one, at just two minutes, five seconds to kick us off.
  2. Aerosmith, Lightning Strikes . . .Great track, likely the best, from the Rock In A Hard Place album in 1982, the band’s only record not to feature guitarist Joe Perry. Jimmy Crespo replaced him. Regardless, still one of the band’s best songs in my opinion and I play it in honor of the Tampa Bay Lightning winning the Stanley Cup – even though I’m a Montreal Canadiens’ fan. Great team though, the Lightning. Good for them.
  1. The Law, Laying Down The Law . . . This was the successful, No. 1 on some charts, single from the one-off 1991 project by Paul Rodgers (Free, Bad Company) and Kenney Jones (Faces/Small Faces, Who) in 1991. Main guitarist on the album was studio session man Jim Barber, who has worked on Mick Jagger’s solo records. Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour, Bryan Adams and Chris Rea also appeared as did latter-day Who bassist Pino Paladino.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Hand Of Fate . . . Back, for a second straight week (played Melody last week) I go to the Black and Blue album for one of my favorite Stones’ tunes. Great solo by Wayne Perkins, who has an extensive resume including work with Lynyrd Skynyrd, Eric Clapton, Bob Marley, on and on.
  1. Stevie Wonder, Black Man . . . Typically great funk groove, even better lyrics, perhaps, in Wonder’s call for worldwide interracial harmony.
  1. Quicksilver Messenger Service, Fresh Air . . . The most successful single, made No. 49 in 1970, from the San Francisco-area psychedelic band whose arguably better-known contemporaries from that scene include the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane.
  1. Billy Gibbons, Desert High . . . ZZ Top is still around, apparently planning another studio album and tour after a 50th anniversary tour was put on hold due to the covid-19 pandemic. In the meantime, guitarist Billy Gibbons got into the solo album game six years ago and is now up to three releases. This great bluesy tune is from his latest work, Hardware, out just a month ago and a truly fine album.
  1. Tim Curry, Simplicity . . . Another slow bluesy tune from the Rocky Horror Picture Show’s Dr. Frank-N-Furter. Title cut from the multi-talented Curry’s third and, to date, final album, in 1981. Sadly, Curry suffered a stroke in 2012 and is confined to a wheelchair but continues to do voice-over work and some musical performances.
  1. David Bowie, The Width Of A Circle . . . Amazing early Bowie from The Man Who Sold The World, featuring the late great Mick Ronson on guitar.
  1. Saga, Humble Stance . . . I don’t think I’ve ever played Saga, from my hometown of Oakville, Ontario, on the show. An oversight rectified by yet another plow through my CD collection and an “oh yeah, these guys.” Jaunty rocker, this, Supertramp-like, to my ears, at least in spots. Or maybe the other way around, Supertramp sounds like Saga. Regardless, good stuff.
  1. The Flying Burrito Brothers, Sin City . . . And now for something completely different. No, not something by the Monty Python troupe but some cool country rock by the Burritos.
  1. AC/DC, Sin City . . . And here’s AC/DC’s version of the Burritos’ tune. Just kidding. Different song and one of my favorites by the hard rockers, Bon Scott era.
  1. Pretenders, Dance . . . I love this one from the Get Close album, 1986. Funky, hypnotic, almost electronic. Not what one would expect from Pretenders, probably, if one knows only their hits.
  1. David Baerwald, Dance . . . And Baerwald’s version of the Pretenders’ tune. Just kidding again and obviously having way too much fun with song titles. Different song, this one from the guy who came to prominence on the fabulous David + David album Boomtown, teaming with David Ricketts for their one and only offering in 1986. Dance is from Baerwald’s debut solo album, Bedtime Stories, in 1990. He releases music sporadically but is active in songwriting for film and television. Ricketts went into production work after David + David split up, and both Davids played on Sheryl Crow’s 1993 debut album, Tuesday Night Music Club.
  1. Albert King, I’ll Play The Blues For You (Parts 1 and 2) . . . Such soulful vocals, and of course great guitar, by one of the masters of the blues.
  1. Howlin’ Wolf, I Asked For Water . . . And she brought him gasoline. Great stuff from another blues master.
  1. Alvin Lee, The Bluest Blues . . . George Harrison plays slide guitar on this slow blues from Lee, famous of course from his days with Ten Years After. It came out in 1994. Wonderful work by both guys, both sadly long gone now.
  1. Rod Stewart, Fool For You . . . My favorite Rod Stewart solo period is 1969-74 when he was usually backed by Faces, with whom he maintained a parallel career. But his stuff after that, up to 1977’s Foot Loose & Fancy Free, is damn good as well. This one’s from his 1976 big hit album, A Night On The Town.
  1. Bachman-Turner Overdrive, Flat Broke Love . . . One of my favorites by the band, from 1975’s Four Wheel Drive. For the most part, I prefer BTO’s songs sung by C.F. (Fred) Turner, and this is another of those.
  1. Black Sabbath, Who Are You . . . I always think of my Grade 10 English class when I listen to 1973’s Sabbath Bloody Sabbath album. I wasn’t into the band then, that came a bit later for me. Anyway, we were doing a poetry segment and one of the guys in the class, not in my circle, brought in the lyric sheet from the album to read as poetry. Most of the class thought he was nuts, me too, perhaps being less open-minded then. But credit to him, and to the teacher for allowing a wide range of contributions. Somehow or other, perhaps, it fueled my coming interest in the band.
  1. The Who, 905 . . . Ah, John Entwistle and his acerbic wit. About test tube babies, cloning, etc. Great stuff, from Who Are You in 1978, Keith Moon’s last album with the group.
  1. Queen, Spread Your Wings . . . Not released as a single in North America, it was a top-30 hit in Europe and yet another indication of the depth of quality in most albums by the great 1960s and in Queen’s case, ’70s bands.
  1. Elton John, Tell Me When The Whistle Blows . . . As I was saying about the Queen track above. Elton John was on another level in the early- to mid-1970s – and he was releasing two albums a year, as per his contract, for some of that time. One of my favorite songs by EJ, this one from Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirty Cowboy, 1975.
  1. Pat Benatar, Rated X . . . A B-side on the I Need A Lover single from Benatar’s 1979 debut album In The Heat Of The Night. It was an A-side, later, in France. I’ve never understood why it’s not on any Benatar compilations. Great tune, written by Canadian Nick Gilder of Sweeney Todd and solo fame. No matter, I’ve long had the album and of course these days music is so widely available you can hear it anytime you wish.
  1. Ramones, Out Of Time . . . And, I am out of time for another week. The Ramones’ version of the Rolling Stones’ tune which features one of my favorite lyrical put down lines in music – “you’re obsolete, my baby.” From Acid Eaters, the Ramones’ 1993 covers album of some of their favorite 1960s songs.

CKMS Community Connections for 12 July 2021 with Phöenix Lazare

Show Notes

Today Bob was joined by Phöenix Lazare on a web conference. There were technical difficulties resulting in really poor sound quality, so there’s no podcast of today’s show available. We’ll have Phöenix back for another interview when the studio re-opens, and Bob has access to real broadcast audio equipment.

Online:

CKMS 102.7 FM Radio Waterloo Community Connections | For Monday 12 July 2021 with Phöenix Lazare (webconference screenshot of Phöenix Lazare laughing and Bob Jonkman laughing in the avatar)
Phöenix Lazare

Music Index

All music today is by Phöenix Lazare.

Time Title Album
0m00s Greatness Phöenix Lazare | Against All Odds (Phöenix Lazare sitting in a field at the edge of the woods)
Against All Odds
2m27s Phöenix and Bob talk about Greatness, Phöenix’s career and her degree in Songwriting; what comes first, lyrics or music? “Depends…” Writing song lyrics is not like writing poetry. Talking about Against All Odds.
9m 12s Against All Odds Phöenix Lazare | Against All Odds (Phöenix Lazare sitting in a field at the edge of the woods)
Against All Odds
12m08s What I’d Give Gold | Phöenix Lazare (Phöenix Lazare on a rocky beach)
Gold
15m38s Rubberband
18m47s This Too Shall Pass
22m12s Enough
25m26s “Phöenix” is spelled with an umlaut, but pronounced without it. Doesn’t help get the gigs, though. Talking about Covid, and performing online, and playing the Folk clubs.
33m05s Warm Soles Phöenix Lazare | Against All Odds (Phöenix Lazare sitting in a field at the edge of the woods)
Against All Odds
35m40s Winter White
38m12s Technical difficulties, so switching back to the studio’s pre-recorded music.
39m33s The Other Side Gold | Phöenix Lazare (Phöenix Lazare on a rocky beach)
Gold
41m24s Gold
44m55s Winter White
47m28s Settle Down in Seattle
53m12s Salt
55m28s Bob gives the end credits.
56m08s River Phöenix Lazare | Against All Odds (Phöenix Lazare sitting in a field at the edge of the woods)
Against All Odds

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Saturday from 1:00pm to 2:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

CKMS logo with wavies coming out the sidesSubscribe to the CKMS Community Connections podcast!

CKMS | 102.7 FM | Radio Waterloo | Community ConnectionsSee all CKMS Community Connections shows!

Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2021 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

CKMS NEWS – 2021-07-09 – On the Myth of Revitalized Urban Spaces: Considering the Case of Goudies Lane

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Host: Shalaka Jadhav

Robyn Burns and Lisbeth A. Berbary are academic workers in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies at the University of Waterloo.  In early 2021, they published their article “Placemaking as Unmaking: Settler Colonialism, Gentrification, and the Myth of “Revitalized” Urban Spaces”, taking up the example of Goudies Lane, a corridor in downtown Kitchener which stretches from Queen Street North to Ontario Street. 

Their work on Goudies Lane came out of Robyn’s dissertation research, where Robyn foregrounded her interest in anti-gentrification with support from her supervisor, Lisbeth, in thinking through the related theory and methodology.  Particularly during the pandemic, when public spaces have seen increased use, they have also seen increased surveillance as a consequence of placemaking: so how public are these public spaces? 

Together, Robyn and Lisbeth talk through the growing tensions between public space, public memory, and how colonialism engages at those intersections by walking through their methods, findings, and presenting key reflections.  

Read Robyn Burns and Lisbeth A. Berbary’s Placemaking as Unmaking: Settler Colonialism, Gentrification, and the Myth of “Revitalized” Urban Spaces

This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca.

Music for this episode was courtesy of Dylan Prowse.

CKMS News – 2021-07-08 – Final recommendations for controversial Prime Ministers’ path project in Baden

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Host: Namish Modi

This piece features an interview with Guy Freedman, president of the First People’s Group, who consulted on the Prime Minister’s Path in Baden. The interview took place on July 5. 

The group released its recommendations on June 30 in preparation for a Special Council meeting for the Township of Wilmot on July 5, 2021.

The first People’s Group advises removal and cancellation of the whole PM’s Path in Baden, including all existing statues which lie behind the administration building. The final decision will be up to the council. 

Over the past couple months, The First People’s Group has engaged the public in terms of the future of the Path. There was a large response to the engagement with 461 responses in the community engagement forum. The future of the path became further in question following the discovery of unmarked graves of children all over Canada.


This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

The Gems Of Life Show

Join me today at 11:00 AM.

Fadumo Farah is a British Somali,  a mother, a wife, an entrepreneur and designer.

Fadumo went from able to disable, to breaking barriers in the fashion industry with a new fashion wheelchair friendly clothing line for able and disabled people,  it doesn’t stop there, Fadumo’s clothing line will be featured in the London Fashion week.

I loved and enjoyed the conversation I had with Fadumo, and I will bring more of Fadumo Farah story as her journey in life continues to inspire and impact many people.

 

 

 

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, July 5, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. The J. Geils Band, Musta Got Lost (live, from Blow Your Face Out including Peter Wolf’s immortal intro rap) . . . The studio version was a No. 12 single in 1975 and arguably the band’s best-known song before the mass commercial success of the Freeze Frame album in 1981. But this live version is ‘the’ definitive version, thanks to lead singer Peter Wolf’s intro.
  1. Roger Waters, Amused To Death (live) . . . No, not another show featuring songs from live albums. I intend to get back to that eventually, but just happened to start with a couple which I couldn’t/didn’t squeeze into the live album show of a few weeks ago. Nine-minute title cut from Waters’ 1992 album, this version taken from the In The Flesh live album, from 2000. The song title was inspired by Neil Postman’s 1985 book Amusing Ourselves To Death which had a big influence on my thinking and I highly recommend.
  1. Pink Floyd, Pigs (Three Different Ones) . . . My favorite song from a personal favorite Floyd album, Animals, from 1977, a record which, to the mainstream, seems to get overlooked amid Dark Side, Wish You Were Here and The Wall. Meddle, the album before The Dark Side Of The Moon, shares that circumstance with Animals . . . Love the “You fucked up old hag…” A reference to UK morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse, who Deep Purple similarly disparaged in Mary Long from their 1973 Who Do We Think We Are album.
  1. Led Zeppelin, What Is And What Should Never Be . . . I always remember when my older brother, by eight years, brought Led Zeppelin II home and, at first, being overwhelmed by the heaviness of it in contrast to the Beatles’ and Stones’ diet I had pretty much subsisted on to that point. And then being fascinated, hearing that guitar break coming out of first one speaker channel, then the other.
  1. Queen, Dead On Time . . . Killer Queen rock, pun intended, from the Jazz album. Yet another great Queen track written by guitarist Brian May, who wrote so many of the great Queen tunes, hits or otherwise.
  1. Black Sabbath, Heaven And Hell . . . From the terrific first Sabbath album featuring the late great Ronnie James Dio on lead vocals. I got into this album via the DJ at that bar, The Riverside in Oakville, Ontario that I often reference I worked at during college. We had live rock bands upstairs in the place, which featured a disco (we’re talking late 1970s), an acoustic downstairs cubbyhole, an outside patio (no live music) and the upstairs Boathouse as I recall it was called, where the rock bands played. Anyway, between sets we had a DJ playing stuff and Sabbath’s Heaven And Hell was one of those, along with Ted Nugent’s Double Live Gonzo, Judas Priest’s British Steel and Stained Class, and AC/DC’s Highway To Hell and Back In Black that he played the shit out of and as a result got me into those albums. Love the album cover, too, the Sabbath one, three angels smoking cigarettes. A particularly amazing album when one considers that Sabbath had just lost iconic singer Ozzy Osbourne, people wondered about the band and they responded with a stone-cold classic. Similar to what AC/DC did with Back In Black after Bon Scott died.
  1. AC/DC, Problem Child . . . Kick butt rocker from the relatively early days of the band, the late Bon Scott on lead vocals. I like both versions of AC/DC but Bon’s vocals sometimes, wow. Like on this tune where, to me, like with lots of Ozzy stuff on early Sabbath albums, he, dunno how to explain it, seems to sort of come in from somewhere else, riding the opening riff and then off they all go to even greater heights. To me, this track is an example of that.
  1. Deep Purple, No No No . . . From Fireball. Aside from Ian Gillan, the band members don’t seem to like this album but as a big Purple fan I think everything they’ve done, all versions of the band, is worthwhile.
  1. Thin Lizzy, Opium Trail . . . I like Lizzy a lot and anyone who’s into them knows they are far more than The Boys Are Back In Town. This propulsive track is from the, to me, killer Bad Reputation (great title track I’ve played before) album, arguably a harder-rocking offering than some preceding work. Yet they released the relatively softer Dancing In The Moonlight (good song) as the lone single, backed with the title track.
  2. The Doors, The Changeling . . . Nice bluesy track from what is perhaps my favorite Doors album, L.A. Woman.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Melody . . . Essentially a duet between Mick Jagger and then Stones’ session man, keyboard player and great artist in his own right Billy Preston. From the album, Black And Blue, that Keith Richards has categorized as ‘auditioning guitar players’ from which the Stones settled on Ron Wood to replace the departed Mick Taylor. Jeff Beck, Rory Gallagher, Harvey Mandel (Canned Heat, John Mayall) and noted session player (for too many artists to count) Wayne Perkins (great solo on the album’s Hand Of Fate) auditioned. Another one of those songs that shows the Stones’ versatility and, more so perhaps, willingness to tackle any genre. The album was largely panned when it came out but, as is often the case, it’s now considered the classic we Stones fans knew it was, from the beginning.
  1. Jethro Tull, Alive And Well And Living In . . . A track from the expanded re-release of the sometimes (aside from Tull fans like me) overlooked Benefit album, 1970. The song also came out on the North American CD release of the Living In The Past compilation, originally released in 1972.
  1. Chicago, In The Country . . . You saw how I did that? From the Tull song title to . . . living In The Country. Ha! Anyway, another great tune from the second Chicago album, 1970. They were, to me, ridiculously good for the first three albums especially, and on until Terry Kath’s sad death at age 31 in 1978 via an unintentional self-inflicted gunshot wound.
  1. The Kinks, Celluloid Heroes . . . Another late 1960s/early 1970s (this from 1972) Kinks’ song to not make the charts. Just absurd. A well-known song by the band, nevertheless, and deservedly so.
  1. Rainbow, Self Portrait . . . Another nice tune featuring the lead vocals of Ronnie James Dio, this from the first Rainbow album. After two more Rainbow albums, Dio left to replace Ozzy in Black Sabbath on the Heaven And Hell album. Dio made any band he was in better. I can barely stomach the more pop-oriented Rainbow, aside from a few tracks, after Dio’s departure.
  1. Blue Oyster Cult, Flaming Telepaths . . . Early Blue Oyster Cult, from Secret Treaties, their third album and last of the ‘black and white’ period of album covers. Typically spooky stuff from that period, this before the next studio album, Agents Of Fortune, which featured their deserved breakthrough hit, (Don’t Fear) The Reaper.
  1. Jeff Beck, Max’s Tune . . . From Rough And Ready, from the second iteration of the Jeff Beck Group – first version with Rod Stewart and Ron Wood; second with Bobby Tench (vocals, rhythm guitar) Max Middleton (piano/keyboards) Clive Garman (bass) and Cozy Powell (drums). Also known as Raynes Park Blues. I don’t know how to describe this one, actually, mellow for the most part, jazzy. I just like it.
  1. Savoy Brown, Money Can’t Save Your Soul . . . Nice bluesy track from a band I very much like and who I saw, great show, at a recent Kitchener Blues Festival.
  1. ZZ Top, 2000 Blues . . . From 1990’s Recycler album which marked, somewhat, the band’s emergence from the huge hit, synthesizer-driven 1980s albums like Eliminator (Legs, etc.) and Afterburner and back to, at least on this one, the blues that was the band’s original bread and butter. Of course, they’ve been much less successful, commercially, since but I’ll just leave it at that – and I do like some of the ‘synthesizer’ stuff; good songs in there amid the murk.
  1. Bruce Springsteen, Darkness On The Edge Of Town . . . Title track from the wall-to-wall quality 1978 album. As previously mentioned, I like his before and after work but my favorite albums of his remain Born To Run, this one, Darkness, and then The River. Age, time/place, whatever, to me he was at his peak musically and lyrically.

CKMS Community Connections for 5 July 2021

Show Notes

Today we have a debut of Fly Away Child from KW musician Sammy Duke, and two tracks from Phöenix Lazare’s new album that will be released this Friday, 9 July 2021. Join us next week for an interview with Phöenix. And today’s show is filled out with lots of other Kitchener-Waterloo-Cambridge content.

Music Index

Time Title Artist Album
0m00s Theme for CKMS Community Connections ccc Steve Todd
CKMS Community Connections
00m57s Fly Away Child Sammy Duke Fly Away Child | Sammy Duke (black silhouttes of birds on a white background)
(single)
5m23s Rubberband Phöenix Lazare Phöenix Lazare | Against All Odds (Phöenix Lazare sitting in a field at the edge of the woods)
Gold
8m31s Against All Odds
12m10s Confusion (SYNTHWAVE) (Linker Remix) Clarissa Diokno Clarissa Diokno | Confusion | Synthwave Remix (thermograph image of a person behind the text)
(single)
15m11s You Put My Mind At Ease Taylor Davison You Put My Mind At Ease (illustration of waves)
(singles)
18m24s Christina
22m00s Swordfish Juneyt Juneyt | Ocean (Juneyt holding a guitar sitting at the oceanside)
Ocean
27m47s Tesla
32m50s Sweetest Apple Po Cholly (Po Cholly on stage with mics and amplifiers)
Special Rider
36m48s I Can’t Quit You Ginger St. James (Ginger St. James in front of a large tractor tire)
(singles)
41m23s Don’t Deceive Me
45m11s So Many Roads Tim Lee and the Revelators Tim Lee | with Mel Brown | Revelators
Tim Lee with Mel Brown
51m25s Free Rollin’ Man
55m52s Same Ol’ Blues John Lee (John Lee and the Hookers on stage)
Wednesday Night Jam

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Saturday from 1:00pm to 2:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

CKMS logo with wavies coming out the sidesSubscribe to the CKMS Community Connections podcast!

CKMS | 102.7 FM | Radio Waterloo | Community ConnectionsSee all CKMS Community Connections shows!

Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2021 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

CKMS News -2021-07-02- Waterloo Region Weekly Roundup

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Host: Melissa Bowman

Today’s Waterloo Region Weekly Roundup episode focuses on the June 22nd Region of Waterloo council meeting. This was a rather full agenda as it was the last council meeting prior to the summer break.

Topics discussed at this meeting included the Climate Action Plan, several housing projects, and an update regarding the Region’s child care plan since closing the 5 regionally owned centres last year. There’s also a discussion regarding plans for the Charles Street terminal redevelopment and ReallocateWR’s proposal for an Indigenous Community Hub on that land.

This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

The Gems Of Life Show- In Conversation With Secretary General Roda Muse

Super excited for todays episode show  Secretary General of the Canadian Commission  for UNESCO.

Roda Muse shares her gems of life, and  the importance of expanding our skills, experience  and knowledge through volunteering. Ms. Muse share with us the importance of empowering our children so they too can be the best version of themselves and that we all have opportunity to impact, contribute, support, learn from our experiences and create new opportunities.

Listen in to the show to learn more.

https://en.ccunesco.ca/about-ccunesco/our-team

Please subscribe to our YouTube channel, like, comment, share.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLdfinIbTCK8z5Dw0G3emnA

Secretary General  video goes live at 7pm.

Stay well and safe.

 

 

 

 

The Socially Radical Guitarist

show logoThe Socially Radical Guitarist will inform the public on political history, community led social movements, new and emerging music in the community and around the world, and will provide a radical political perspective. The program is sponsored by The African and Caribbean Inclusion Centre: https://www.aciccanada.ca. A major fundraiser is being held to provide comprehensive services to newcomers. Every bit helps. Please support this major initiative launched by the African and Caribbean Inclusion Centre: https://gofund.me/b6c5f31f

Continue reading The Socially Radical Guitarist