So Old It’s New set list for Monday, April 29, 2024

A box set show selected from some of the many such collections I own. Song clips follow my full track-by-track tales, after the list below.

1. Aerosmith, Rattlesnake Shake (live radio broadcast WKRQ Cincinnati, 1971) . . . from Pandora’s Box.

2. Whitford/St. Holmes, Sharpshooter . . . from Pandora’s Box/Whitford St. Holmes album, 1981.

3. Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, Two Men Talking . . . From An American Treasure box set, outtake from the Hypnotic Eye (2012 release) album sessions.

4. The Rolling Stones, Strictly Memphis . . . driving, funky outtake from Dirty Work album sessions, Mick Jagger/Bobby Womack lead vocal duet issued on Great Dane Records bootleg box set Hot Stuff Volume 2, In Studio 1962-1989.

5. Led Zeppelin, Baby Come On Home . . . previously unreleased track until Boxed Set 2, 1993.

6. Faces, Dishevelment Blues . . . from Five Guys Walk Into A Bar . . .

7. Taste, Railway and Gun . . . from I’ll Remember box, Take 2 remix of On The Boards album track.

8. AC/DC, Down On The Borderline . . . from Backtracks, B-side of 1990 single Moneytalks from The Razors Edge album.

9. The Kinks, Afternoon Tea . . from 2014 release The Anthology 1964-1971; slightly longer remix of song originally released on Something Else album, 1967.

10. Jimi Hendrix, Shame Shame Shame . . . from West Coast Seattle Boy: The Jimi Hendrix Anthology

11. Little Feat, Wait Till The Shit Hits The Fan . . . from Hotcakes and Outtakes: 30 Years of Little Feat, outtake from Little Feat (first album) sessions.

12. The Police, Fall Out . . . from Message In A Box: The Complete Recordings, first Police single, 1977.

13. Bruce Springsteen, Because The Night (live) . . . from Live 1975–85, co-written with Patti Smith. Originally recorded in 1977 and targeted for Springsteen’s Darkness On The Edge Of Town album, it was given to Smith and first appeared in studio version and became a hit from her 1978 album Easter.

14. Bob Dylan, Catfish . . . A salute to then star baseball pitcher Jim (Catfish) Hunter, an outtake from the Desire album sessions first appeared on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991.

15. Janis Joplin/Big Brother and the Holding Company, Road Block (live at 1967 Monterey Pop Festival) . . . from Janis boxed set, 1993, previously unreleased to that point.

16. Jethro Tull, The Chateau D’Isaster Tapes (a. Scenario b. Audition c. No Rehearsal) . . . from 20 Years of Jethro Tull The Definitive Collection, 1988, from the original scrapped A Passion Play album sessions.

17. Eric Clapton with Santana, Eyesight To The Blind/Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad? (live) . . . From Crossroads 2 (live in the seventies).

My full track-by-track tales:

1. Aerosmith, Rattlesnake Shake (live radio broadcast WKRQ Cincinnati, 1971) . . . from Pandora’s Box. A Fleetwood Mac track written by Peter Green for his last album with the Mac, 1969’s Then Play On. I think it’s improperly credited to Nanci Griffith and Jimmie Dale Gilmore; it says Griffith/Gilmore in the box set booklet but it’s the Mac song, unless Green stole it and credited it to himself but I can’t find any crediting other than Green. In any event, it was done before a live radio studio audience before Aerosmith had an album out. That came two years later with the band’s debut record in 1973. Aerosmith’s roots go back to 1964 when the eventual unit was playing in different outfits before singer Steven Tyler discovered guitarist Joe Perry and bass player Tom Hamilton playing in the Jam Band in the Boston area, sought them out and the rest is history.

2. Whitford/St. Holmes, Sharpshooter . . . Aside from a couple Joe Perry Project albums I bought on a 2-fer compilation years ago, while I like and have forever been into Aerosmith, not enough to have followed all their various offshoot or solo projects. So I only discovered this hard rocking boogie tune from 1981’s Whitford/St. Holmes album via Pandora’s Box when I bought the box upon its release in 1991. The Whitford/St. Holmes album, Aerosmith guitarist Whitford working with Ted Nugent collaborator Derek St. Holmes, came during a period where Aerosmith was in tatters with both Perry and Whitford having quit the band. Singer Steven Tyler held the mother ship together with replacement players Jimmy Crespo and Rick Dufay for the I think creditable though critically-panned Rock In A Hard Place album in 1982 – the killer song Lightning Strikes alone makes that record worthwhile. And soon enough, the original boys were back together.

3. Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, Two Men Talking . . . An outtake from the Hypnotic Eye (2012 release) album sessions that was released on the An American Treasure box set in 2018. Nice guitar groove with perfectly placed spices of piano. According to the American Treasure liner notes, The Heartbreakers had played the song live but never could get it to work, to their satisfaction, in studio. Then, one day, they did and Petty fans are appreciative.

4. The Rolling Stones, Strictly Memphis . . . a driving, funky outtake from the Dirty Work album sessions, arguably worthy of making the album but it didn’t. It’s a Mick Jagger/Bobby Womack of soul/funk/R & B/rock fame lead vocal duet issued on the Great Dane Records 4-CD bootleg box set Hot Stuff Volume 2, In Studio 1962-1989 that I picked up somewhere along the line. Good sound, too, which is always a risk with bootlegs but I’ve been fortunate for the very most part with such releases over time. I love bootleg label names like Great Dane Records and another, The Swingin’ Pig Records, which did lots of Stones, Led Zeppelin and Beatles bootlegs, among others.

5. Led Zeppelin, Baby Come On Home . . . from Boxed Set 2, a blues/soul track co-written (and actually, un-Zep like because it was actually co-credited to) by Bert Berns, whose name might not ring a bell but whose songwriting/co-songwriting credits on songs made famous by other artists should: Twist and Shout, Here Comes The Night, Hang On Sloopy, Piece of My Heart, Cry To Me, Everybody Needs Somebody To Love, Baby Let Me Take You Home, Cry Baby . . . As for the Zep set, the track was arguably the selling point of the band’s second box set back before one could access pretty much anything on the web; the box was issued in 1993, three years after the first such compilation issued by the band. Any Zep fan worth their salt already had all the individual studio albums but may have bought the box sets anyway, for tracks like this, and for the different sequencing of songs which I recall, and I agree, a reviewer saying somehow made it appear as if one were hearing stuff you knew and had heard before, yet in a different enough way as to make it sound fresh.

6. Faces, Dishevelment Blues . . . from Five Guys Walk Into A Bar . . . A box set title, Five Guys . . . and yes, the ellipsis (three dots) is part of the title, one that perfectly sums up the Faces’ ramshackle, rowdy, booze-soaked approach to music and life and what endeared the band to so many. Not to mention, they were damn good musically in their raunch and roll way. This is a Led Zeppelin-like blues track that, apparently, was a throwaway Faces had no intention of releasing. According to one Faces-related website: “When asked for material for a promo-flexi-disc by the New Musical Express, the Faces couldn’t be bothered to write a new song, instead tossing the magazine this one-off atrocity of a languid, idle, drunk, badly recorded blues rock track, thinking ‘they wouldn’t have the balls to use it’, as keykboardist Ian McLagan puts it.”

Atrocity, languid, idle, hell, I like it! Perfect title, too. It is disheveled. That’s why it’s good.

7. Taste, Railway and Gun . . . from the I’ll Remember box, Take 2 remix of On The Boards album track. Not all that much different from the album, about a minute longer, typically fine guitar from Rory Gallagher. What more could you ask for?

8. AC/DC, Down On The Borderline . . . from Backtracks, it’s the B-side of 1990 single Moneytalks from The Razors Edge album.

9. The Kinks, Afternoon Tea . . from 2014’s 5 -CD release The Anthology 1964-1971. This is a slightly longer remix of a song originally released on the Something Else album, 1967. A typically appealing ‘very British’ type Kinks song of that period of their existence.

10. Jimi Hendrix, Shame Shame Shame . . . from West Coast Seattle Boy: The Jimi Hendrix Anthology. Something of a funky jam session while Hendrix was trying to refine the song Room Full Of Mirrors to his exacting specifications, resulting in a sort of jam/combination track although I’m just playing the specific Shame Shame Shame portion which is a stand-alone song in itself. Not exacting, not perfect, but sometimes it can be best to just let ‘er rip as one finds the right feel for a song. No, er, shame in that.

11. Little Feat, Wait Till The Shit Hits The Fan . . . from Hotcakes and Outtakes: 30 Years of Little Feat, a box set that by all accounts is out of print, and absurdly expensive online, so I’m glad I got it ages ago. This is an outtake from the Little Feat (first album) sessions. Recorded in 1970, the band’s debut record came out in 1971.

12. The Police, Fall Out . . . from Message In A Box: The Complete Recordings. The first Police single, 1977. Punk rock aggressive track, short (2 minutes) and sweet, notable because it featured guitarist Henry Padovani, a short-term member of The Police who later became part of Wayne County and The Electric Chairs. Padovani was replaced in The Police by Andy Summers who for a brief time was second guitarist in the band, alongside Padovani, before The Police settled on their trio lineup.

13. Bruce Springsteen, Because The Night (live) . . . from Live 1975–85, co-written with Patti Smith. Originally recorded in 1977 and targeted for Springsteen’s Darkness On The Edge Of Town album, it was given to Smith and first appeared in studio version and became a hit from her 1978 album Easter. I first cottoned to the song – which prompted me to investigate Patti Smith’s music and glad for it – when a bar band played it, during my college days.

14. Bob Dylan, Catfish . . . A salute to then star baseball pitcher Jim (Catfish) Hunter. It’s a bluesy, acoustic outtake from the Desire album sessions that first appeared on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991. That amazing series, to Dylan fans like me at least, is now at Volume 17 covering the various stages of his career, both in studio and live, although a 2023 article in Rolling Stone magazine suggested the series might be petering out. That said, a multi-disc expanded version of the Bob Dylan at Budokan live album from 1978 recently came out, although it wasn’t labelled as a “bootleg series’ release.

15. Janis Joplin/Big Brother and the Holding Company, Road Block (live at 1967 Monterey Pop Festival) . . . from the ‘Janis’ boxed set, 1993, previously unreleased to that point. Funky sort of jam essentially just repeating the song title and yet . . . it works.

16. Jethro Tull, The Chateau D’Isaster Tapes (a. Scenario b. Audition c. No Rehearsal) . . . from 20 Years of Jethro Tull The Definitive Collection, 1988, the song is from the original scrapped A Passion Play album sessions. The A Passion Play sessions at first did not go well but are an interesting insight into the creative process. It was 1972 and Tull went into the studio to record the followup to Thick As A Brick but after a time, realized it wasn’t working. So they ditched what they were doing and eventually started again, and out came the official A Passion Play album, released in 1973. But those initial tapes were left behind, eventually surfacing on this track on the 1988 boxed set 20 Years Of Jethro Tull and then in full bloom in 1993 on the fine 2-CD compilation Nightcap: The Unreleased Masters 1973-1991. The Nightcap release included, on CD 1, the Chateau d’Isaster Tapes, the entire originally planned album of songs that morphed into A Passion Play. As with Dylan’s Bootleg series, and those of others, you could include Tull (which has a second boxed set I didn’t touch on today) among those bands with an amazing amount of obscure/previously unreleased/relatively unheard gems.

17. Eric Clapton with Santana, Eyesight To The Blind/Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad? (live) . . . From Crossroads 2 (live in the seventies). Clapton enjoyed success with his then (1988 release) careeer-spanning box set Crossroads. It wasn’t the first such release. To my knowledge and research, Bob Dylan’s 1985 release Biograph started the box set trend at least among musicians of 60s and 70s vintage but Clapton’s was the one that really set things afire. In any event, in 1996 Clapton went back to the box, so to speak, issuing Crossroads 2, this time entirely live tracks. And what a collection, including this 24-minute but never remotely boring combination Sonny Boy Williamson/Clapton track performed with the Santana band – it could easily be seen as a Santana song – which was opening for Clapton and invited onstage for encores like this, on Clapton’s 1975 American tour.

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