So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Aug. 23, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. Jethro Tull, Life Is A Long Song … This one isn’t, but title-wise a good intro (and a good tune, too) to a show I some time ago threatened to do, so here it is. All long songs.
  1. Yes, The Gates Of Delirium . . . Epic 22-minute track, one of just three on 1974’s Relayer album. It’s the lone Yes album to feature keyboardist Patrick Moraz, replacing the departed Rick Wakeman. Inspired by Tolstoy’s War and Peace, the track ends with Soon, extracted as a single.
  1. Led Zeppelin, In The Light . . . Apparently, it’s Jimmy Page’s favorite from 1975’s double album, the mighty Physical Graffiti which, some have suggested, represents Zeppelin at the peak of their powers. Possibly, but with such bands, the ‘peak’ I’ve always felt is whatever of their output one is listening to right now, if it appeals to you.
  1. Genesis, The Cinema Show . . . Speaking of peaks, I can never decide which is my favorite album of Genesis’s early, progressive rock period with Peter Gabriel. For me, it’s between Nursery Cryme, Foxtrot, or Selling England By The Pound although over time I’ve gotten more into The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, which is good, but I don’t playit as much as the other three. In any event, this one’s from Selling England By The Pound.
  1. Santana, Treat (live at Fillmore West, 1968) .. . Great piano by Greg Rolie to start the song, with Carlos Santana’s guitar then driving the rest of the track. I pulled this off Santana Live At The Fillmore, 1968. The songs were recorded at San Francisco shows in December of that year but not pulled together as an album and released until 1997. Early Santana, one year before their debut studio album. A great record.
  1. The Allman Brothers Band, High Cost Of Low Living (live) . . . Live version, from 2004’s One Way Out, of my favorite track from the final Brothers’ studio album, the excellent Hittin’ The Note from 2003. It’s the onlyAllmans’ studio album not to include guitarist Dickey Betts, who left the band under acrimonious circumstances in 2000. He was replaced by Derek Trucks, who teamed with Warren Haynes on the studio record and the live album/tour.
  1. Grateful Dead, Terrapin Station . . . I’m certainly no Deadhead but I’ve gotten more and more into them over time, starting of course, like perhaps most neophytes, with Truckin’, on compilations ages ago before purchasing American Beauty, Workingman’s Dead and, how could one resist for the title alone, Live Dead. This is the epic 16-minute title track from their 1977 album, building into a progressive rock and jazz tour de force.
  1. Pink Floyd, Echoes . . . 23-minute closer from the Meddle album in 1971. I don’t know what to say about Echoes except I’ve always liked it, will always like it. Epitomizes Pink Floyd, really.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Goin’ Home . . . Extended jam of more than 11 minutes, rare for the Stones at least on studio albums. From arguably their best early album, Aftermath, in 1966. It was their first release of all-original material.

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