Category Archives: Shows

Posts about shows and programmers.

Daniel xie, Associate editor of The Canada Files, will be joining us!

We’re pleased to have Daniel Xie, associate editor of The Canada Files, proud member of the Communist Party of Canada, and member of the CJTO join us on September 11th! Daniel would like to remind everyone that there is a fundraising drive for The Canada Files! Please donate if you can do so here: https://donorbox.org/the-canada-files.

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So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Sept. 6, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. The Rolling Stones, Can You Hear The Music . . . Somewhat ethereal tune from Goats Head Soup, yet another deep cut showing the Stones’ diversity in approach and music that – as with many great artists – those only listening to hit singles (which is fine) maybe never hear or appreciate.
  1. Alan Parsons Project, Sirius/Mammagamma/Lucifer . . . I wanted to play some Alan Parsons Project, haven’t in a long while, but couldn’t decide between these instrumentals. So I put them all together as one lengthy cut.
  1. Eagles, Long Road Out Of Eden . . . Long title track from the band’s 2007 album, the first (and likely last) studio album they’ve done since 1979’s The Long Run. Typically acerbic lyrics sung by Don Henley. Great, at times spooky, tune.
  1. Kansas, Portrait (He Knew) . . . Besides Carry On Wayward Son from Leftoverture (which I’ve long since owned), Point Of Know Return, via the hit single Dust In The Wind, is really the album that got me into Kansas and how I discovered this tune, one of my favorites by the band and the third single from the album. It made No. 64 on the charts. Inspired by Albert Einstein, the lyrics were later re-written by Kansas founder member Kerry Livgren for his solo band, to reflect his conversion to Christianity – although even the original Kansas lyrics could be taken to be as much about Jesus Christ as Einstein.
  1. Mott The Hoople, All The Way From Memphis . . . Reconnecting with lots of stuff I haven’t played on the show of late. Always liked Mott The Hoople and Ian Hunter’s solo work. And, there’s a Bad Company connection to Mott via Mick Ralphs, a founding member of both bands.
  1. Rush, Working Man . . . I tend to always play this song at some point in my Labour Day set. Great rocker from the early, pre-progressive days, with the late John Rutsey on drums. From the self-titled debut album in 1974.
  1. Bruce Cockburn, Justice . . . Timeless lyrics, from Cockburn’s 1981 album Inner City Front.
  1. Pete Townshend and Ronnie Lane, My Baby Gives It Away . . . A leftover, of sorts, from my Charlie Watts tribute show last week. Meant to play it, but got lost in the shuffle (true story: I couldn’t find my CD to load into the station computer system). Anyway, Watts plays drums, complete with his perhaps trademark ‘thwack’ to end this tune from 1977’s fabulous Rough Mix album. It’s a collaboration between The Who’s Townshend and Lane, of Faces fame, along with many of their musical friends and luminaries. John Entwistle, Eric Clapton and longtime Stones’ pianist Ian Stewart, among others, contribute.
  1. Rod Stewart, (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want To Be Right . . . A tune done by many artists, written by Homer Banks, Carl Hampton and Raymond Jackson of Stax Records. Stewart, a great interpreter beyond his own songwriting abilities, has always been sterling in his choice of songs to cover, and this is another example. From 1977’s Footloose & Fancy Free album. Stewart’s old band, Faces, recorded it as an outtake for their 1973 album Ooh La La, so perhaps not surprising he chose to revisit it.

  2. John Mellencamp, Emotional Love . . . Interesting story with this track from 1996’s Mr. Happy Go Lucky album. It was written by Mellencamp’s then-bassist Toby Myers. Myers wasn’t sure about it, asked Mellencamp to listen to it, Mellencamp loved it but it was decided to put Mellencamp’s vocals on it and the rest is history. It’s one of my favorite tracks from the album. I like the groove.
  1. Paul McCartney/Wings, Beware My Love (live, from Wings Over America) . . . One of McCartney’s harder rockers, originally on Wings At The Speed Of Sound, an album of mostly softer rock. It’s not metal by any stretch, but I like it when Macca rocks out.
  1. The Beatles, Happiness Is A Warm Gun . . . From 1968’s The Beatles, aka or should we say not also known as but mostly known as The White Album. John Lennon took several song fragments and made them into one coherent whole. Well, I shouldn’t say just Lennon. It was his tune(s) but it’s one of the few songs on the album where all four Beatles actually worked together to hash it out, and all identified it as their favorite track on the record.
  1. T. Rex, I Love To Boogie . . . It’s a boogie tune. And I figured a good one to lead into a harder rocking phase of tonight’s show.
  2. The Stooges, Down On The Street . . . dunta dunta eeyow…etc etc. Typically crazy good stuff from Iggy and the boys.
  1. Nazareth, Not Faking It . . . No, we’re not. Real hard rock and roll.
  1. Status Quo, Paper Plane . . . Quo got a bit too poppy for me later on; I prefer their earlier, harder-rocking hard boogie stuff, like this one from the appropriately named Piledriver album, released in 1972.
  1. Jefferson Airplane, The Last Wall Of The Castle . . . Wicked, hard-rocking psychedelic tune from the maybe somewhat ‘weird’ but wonderful After Bathing At Baxter’s album. Great lead guitar and soloing by Jorma Kaukonen, who wrote the song and handles lead vocals.
  1. Thin Lizzy, Killer Without A Cause . . . I don’t know what more to say about Thin Lizzy besides I like all their stuff and anyone who thinks The Boys Are Back In Town is all they ever did, needs to dig deeper. They could fill the Grand Canyon with their great work.
  1. Blue Cheer, Saturday Freedom . . . Best known, likely, for their version of Eddie Cochran’s Summertime Blues, this is from the band’s self-titled fourth album, a more diverse one in style but still excellent.
  1. The Butterfield Blues Band, In My Own Dream . . . David Sanborn with the great sax solo on this one, the title cut from Butterfield’s 1968 album. It’s the last one with Elvin Bishop on guitar as the band started moving in a more soul-oriented direction after the earlier rocking blues featuring Bishop and Mike Bloomfield.
  1. The Kinks, Holiday In Waikiki . . . The only thing wrong with this song is its length. Too short. Just love the quirky rhythm and guitar work. From the Face To Face album in 1966. Unlike most of The Kinks’ post-British Invasion hit singles-infused albums, which arguably were hit singles and lots of filler like that of the output of many bands of the period, Face To Face didn’t sell particularly well. It’s something of a paradox, as the band got arguably more creative as chief songwriter Ray Davies moved into concept album territory. But the relatively poor-selling material the band did from 1966 to the early 70s, outside of big hit singles like Lola, is terrific. If you want a nice summation, I’d recommend The Kinks Kronikles. It’s a 1972 compilation that gathers lots of those songs and is how I got into this tune years ago. That prompted me to collect the full studio albums from that period of this terrific yet still somewhat underappreciated band in comparison to their contemporaries – Beatles, Stones, Who.
  1. The Doors, Ship Of Fools . . . A friend of mine, now a follower of the show and I got talking about the Doors’ later output some time ago, after I played a tune from the L.A. Woman album. So hard to pick, I like all Doors albums, but Woman might be my favorite of theirs – dark, bluesy, booze, cigarette and other smoking things-soaked vocals by Jim Morrison. But the previous record, Morrison Hotel, is similar in its deliberate ‘back to basics’ approach after the experimenation of The Soft Parade. The intro somewhat reminds me of the intro to Break On Through (To The Other Side) from the debut album, but this is a terrific cut in its own right.
  1. Murray McLauchlan, Sixteen Lanes Of Highway . . . Terrific stuff from one of Canada’s greats. Just put on, via CD or whatever your delivery system, the Songs From The Street compilation and Try Walking Away On The Boulevard Down By The Henry Moore or Out Past The Timberline.
  1. Bruce Springsteen, Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out . . . One of those tunes I came across while searching for something else in the radio station’s computer system. Was looking for Free songs, up came Free-ze Out so I thought, why not? Haven’t played The Boss recently always liked this one, among many by Springsteen. And Free will have to wait at least another week.
  1. Canned Heat, So Long Wrong . . . Latter period (then) Heat, same old great blues. From 1973’s The New Age album. Formed in 1965, Canned Heat is still around, no original members, drummer/singer Adolfo de la Parra, who joined in 1967, is still there but founder members/chief songwriters Bob (The Bear) Hite and Alan (Blind Owl) Wilson are long gone to the great gig in the sky. It’s interesting, though, going through the looong list of former members. Included are Larry Taylor, who had several stints in Canned Heat as well as with John Mayall and Tom Waits. Also, Harvey Mandel, who once auditoned for/played on The Rolling Stones’ Black and Blue album and also was with John Mayall for a time. Noted bluesman Walter Trout also had a stint, 1981-85, in Canned Heat.

81 82 83 84

81 82 83 84 is a retro-alternative show focusing on music I loved when I was an undergrad and volunteered at CKMS in the early 1980’s. Music will be mostly New Wave, punk, ska, early goth. Some experimental stuff too, with the occasional more-mainstream tune mixed in.

81 82 83 84 airs on Saturday from 10:00pm to 11:00pm.

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81 82 83 84 81 82 83 84 is a retro-alternative show focusing on music I loved when I was an undergrad and volunteered at CKMS in the early 1980’s. Music will be mostly New Wave, punk, ska, early goth. Some experimental stuff too, with the occasional more-mainstream tune mixed in. 81 82 83 84 airs on Saturday from … Continue reading 81 82 83 84

See all previous episodes.

So Old It’s New set list (Charlie Watts tribute) for Monday, Aug 30/21 – on air 8-10 pm ET

All tracks feature Charlie Watts and are Rolling Stones songs, except tracks 23-26 which are from side projects including his jazz band.

1. Flip The Switch . . . And Charlie comes crashing in right off the bat on this, the opening cut to the Stones’ 1997 release, Bridges To Babylon. My two boys and I used to ‘play’ this one in our air guitar band when they were young, and then my older son, then 9, saw/heard the band play it in April 1998 when I took him to his first Stones’ show, and concert, ever.

 

  1. If You Can’t Rock Me . . . Opening cut from the It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll album, with Watts kicking things off in fine fashion, and throughout. “The band’s on stage and it’s one of those nights…the drummer thinks that he is dynamite” Yes, he is/was.
  2.  Soul Survivor . . . Suggested by my older son, Mark, as we were discussing Watts’ passing, for how in Mark’s words Watts ‘enters’ the song at the four-second mark. Always loved this song, from Exile On Main St, perhaps sort of a different song construction, I’ve heard it described as a ‘sideways’ riff from Keith Richards.
  3.  Shake Your Hips . . . A cover of the hypnotic Slim Harpo tune, also from Exile. Great stuff.
  4. Let It Bleed . . . Here he comes, crashing in at 13 seconds. That part alone has always ‘made’ the song for me but it’s great throughout.
  5. Moon Is Up . . . One of two tunes for this Watts-inspired set, suggested by a friend, Ted Martin who, before I even decided to do a Watts-tribute show, sent me a list of his favorite Watts moments. I like this one, too. It’s from 1994’s Voodoo Lounge album. Watts is credited as playing ‘mystery drum’, which actually was a turned-over steel garbage can.
  6.  Slave . . . Just a great jam, from Tattoo You. Originally recorded during the mid-1970s sessions for the Black and Blue album, it wasn’t released until 1981 when the Stones cobbled together unfinished tunes from previous sessions and put them together for the Tattoo You album. Features Sonny Rollins on sax and a great drum-guitar duel between Watts and Keith Richards over the last two minutes of the six-and-a-half minute cut. The song was originally five seconds under five minutes long on the original album release but when the band released remastered versions, they left in the extra 90 seconds as Keith and Charlie just kept on going as the tapes rolled.
  7.  Driving Too Fast . . . propulsive piece from A Bigger Bang in 2005. Watts, as always, as metronome.
  8.  Down The Road Apiece . . . From the early days, 1965 when Stones albums – in this case The Rolling Stones Now! – were populated largely with blues and R & B covers, and boogie-woogie entries like this one, written by Don Raye and first recorded in 1940. Chuck Berry, who the Stones drew much inspiration from, Jerry Lee Lewis and Foghat are some of the other notables to have covered it.
  9. Terrifying . . . What I’ve described as a roiling track from 1989’s Steel Wheels. It swings, which is what Watts was all about, the ‘roll’ in the rock, in the words of Keith Richards.
  10. When The Whip Comes Down . . . It’s a production thing as well but the drumming on the Some Girls album is so sharp, snappy, solid and just plain great.
  11.  I Go Wild . . . Another from Voodoo Lounge, the first album the Stones did after Bill Wyman left and Darryl Jones came in on bass. Over his own objections, Watts was put ‘in charge’ of making the final call by the band but he knew he had to, given drums and bass form the rhythm section in a rock band. Apparently fuelled by this newfound authority, Watts is said to have yelled ‘turn me up’ at one point in the sessions, all the resulting tunes of which feature his typically terrific drumming.
  12.  Factory Girl . . . Watts plays tabla (twin hand drums) on this one, from Beggars Banquet. He said in a 2003 interview that he played it with sticks, instead of his hands. “I was doing something you shouldn’t do, which is playing the tabla with sticks instead of trying to get that sound using your hand – it’s an extremely difficult technique and painful if you’re not trained.”
  13.  Jigsaw Puzzle . . . One of my favorite Stones tunes. The drumming speaks for itself in what’s been described as a Dylan-esque tune. “and the drummer, he’s so shattered, trying to keep on time…” “and the Queen is bravely shouting, ‘what the HELL is going on?’ ”
  14.  Rocks Off . . . kick butt rocker that opens the Exile album, likely my favorite by the Stones.
  15. Dirty Work . . . Title cut from what’s been described as an ‘angry’ 1986 album, the height of the so-called World War III between Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. But the entire band was in tatters, Watts was uncharacteristically dabbling in heroin for a brief time, yet he was well enough to, uh, smack his way through this kick-ass track. The album got savaged by critics and many fans, but I’ve always loved it.
  16.  Everything Is Turning To Gold . . . Funky, propulsive track was the B-side to the Shattered single, from Some Girls, in 1978 and appeared on the 1981 compilation Sucking In The Seventies.
  17.  Moonlight Mile . . . beautiful track, second one suggested by Ted Martin from a list of his favorites featuring nice work by Watts. From the Sticky Fingers album and rarely played live, I saw/heard them do it at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto on 1999’s No Security tour.
  18. The Lantern . . . From the Satanic Majesties album, 1967. It’s always been – along with 2000 Light Years From Home, 2000 Man and Citadel – one of my favorites from that controversial album, the Stones’ lone dabble in psychedelia.
  19. Let Me Go . . . I’ve always liked the tune but hadn’t thought of it, for a Watts’ tribute show, until I read it mentioned in an article about the late drummer. From the Emotional Rescue album. Good pick by the writer.
  20. Ride On, Baby . . . Nice Watts work on this one, from the Aftermath album sessions but not released until the North American compilation Flowers, in 1967. Along with the Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass) compilation, both of which my older sister had, Flowers served as my introduction to the Stones.
  21. Surprise, Surprise . . . Another one from the early days, great stuff from 1965 and the North American release, Now!
  22. Tim Ries, The Rolling Stones Project, Honky Tonk Women . . . We all know the amazing drumming on the hit single version of this tune, and mine is a deep cuts show so I thought I’d go in another direction with it to start a maybe offbeat section of the show. It’s from the first of two Stones’ covers projects, this one released in 2005, by Ries, an American saxophonist who was a member of the Stones’ touring band from 2003-14. Ries has taught jazz at various academic institutions, including the University of Toronto. His version of the song features Lisa Fischer, who toured with the Stones from 1989-2015, on vocals, Darryl Jones on bass, Keith Richards on guitar and Watts on drums.
  23. Charlie Watts/Jim Kelter Project, Billy Higgins . . . Experimental track from the album Watts did with noted session superstar Keltner, released in 2000. Each of the album’s nine tracks is named for a drummer and honors their specific approach, in this case American free jazz and hard bop stickman Higgins. Watts plays drums on this and all tracks, with Keltner handling percussion, samples and ‘odd drum bits’. Great stuff.
  24. Hopkins/Cooder/Jagger/Wyman/Watts, Highland Fling (from Jamming With Edward) . . . From the one-off album put together by pianist and longtime Stones’ session player Nicky Hopkins (nicknamed Edward), guitarist Ry Cooder, Mick Jagger, Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts in 1969 but not released until 1972. From the liner notes: “Howdy doody whoever receives this record. Here’s a nice little piece of bullshit about this hot waxing which we cut one night in London, England while waiting for our guitar player to get out of bed. It was promptly forgotten (which may have been for the better) until it was unearthed from the family vaults by those two impressive entrepreneurs – Glyn Johns and Marshall Chess. It was they who convinced the artists that this historic jam of the giants should be unleashed on an unsuspecting public. . . . I hope you spend longer listening to it than we did making it.” – Mick Jagger.
  25. Charlie Watts Quintet, Someone To Watch Over Me . . . A Gershwin tune, lyrics by Ira, music by George, recorded and released in 1993 by Watts’s jazz outfit. Longtime Stones’ backup singer Bernard Fowler provided vocals.
  26. Not Fade Away (live, from Stripped) . . . From the Stones’ semi-unplugged 1995 live release. It was one of Watts’s favorite albums by the band. “One of the best we’ve made in the past few years was the album called Stripped,” Watts said in the book According To The Rolling Stones. “I think that’s one of the most interesting records we’ve done, the best-played record we’ve made for years. . . . The version of Not Fade Away is fantastic.” Indeed.
  27. Heaven . . . You might not think it’s the Stones, if you didn’t know the band’s deep cuts. It’s what I enjoy so much about them; their eclecticism and willingness to try anything yet still sound like themselves. Nice, slow-burning groove from the Tattoo You album, I’ve loved it since the album came out in 1981. Even better with headphones.

Ep 30: The End (Ft Aly Bérubé)

Aly Berube is back for one last ride on the season finale of IAM EVERYTHING. She is a creative director, a film maker, and a really rad gal.

I want to thank everyone that has been on my show, iv had some amazing guests and stories and it was an honor.

Look out for a new upcoming show from me on my ig @shyunatown next year.

Until next time. We might meet again.

Good night San Diego.

 

The Gems Of Life Show- Living & Coping With MS

Today at 11 am join us in conversation with Rahma

Rahma is a young talented inspirational woman living with MS. Rahma shares her journey in coping with Multiple Sclerosis, the early symptoms and the challenges she is faced with on a daily basis.

Please support us by subscribing to our channel, like, comment and share so others can benefit.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLdfinIbTCK8z5Dw0G3emnA

Connect with me via email

fadhwa@thegemsoflife.com

Aspire To Inspire

 

episode 278 agriculture show aug 6 2021

Jim Dyer returns to The Agriculture Show with new music and new research results about GHG emissons and  Canada’s Food Guide using a new metric called “Protein as a unifying metric for carbon footprinting livestock

Our playlist:

Wolverton Mountain – Claude King [Merle Kilgore]
Did She Mention My Name – Gordon Lightfoot
Take Me Home, Country Roads – John Denver
Somewhere Over The Rainbow – Israel Kamakawiwoʻole
Stop The Madness – Jim Dyer
Puff The Magic Dragon – Peter, Paul, and Mary

Listen to the broadcast here

 

 

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Aug. 23, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. Jethro Tull, Life Is A Long Song … This one isn’t, but title-wise a good intro (and a good tune, too) to a show I some time ago threatened to do, so here it is. All long songs.
  1. Yes, The Gates Of Delirium . . . Epic 22-minute track, one of just three on 1974’s Relayer album. It’s the lone Yes album to feature keyboardist Patrick Moraz, replacing the departed Rick Wakeman. Inspired by Tolstoy’s War and Peace, the track ends with Soon, extracted as a single.
  1. Led Zeppelin, In The Light . . . Apparently, it’s Jimmy Page’s favorite from 1975’s double album, the mighty Physical Graffiti which, some have suggested, represents Zeppelin at the peak of their powers. Possibly, but with such bands, the ‘peak’ I’ve always felt is whatever of their output one is listening to right now, if it appeals to you.
  1. Genesis, The Cinema Show . . . Speaking of peaks, I can never decide which is my favorite album of Genesis’s early, progressive rock period with Peter Gabriel. For me, it’s between Nursery Cryme, Foxtrot, or Selling England By The Pound although over time I’ve gotten more into The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, which is good, but I don’t playit as much as the other three. In any event, this one’s from Selling England By The Pound.
  1. Santana, Treat (live at Fillmore West, 1968) .. . Great piano by Greg Rolie to start the song, with Carlos Santana’s guitar then driving the rest of the track. I pulled this off Santana Live At The Fillmore, 1968. The songs were recorded at San Francisco shows in December of that year but not pulled together as an album and released until 1997. Early Santana, one year before their debut studio album. A great record.
  1. The Allman Brothers Band, High Cost Of Low Living (live) . . . Live version, from 2004’s One Way Out, of my favorite track from the final Brothers’ studio album, the excellent Hittin’ The Note from 2003. It’s the onlyAllmans’ studio album not to include guitarist Dickey Betts, who left the band under acrimonious circumstances in 2000. He was replaced by Derek Trucks, who teamed with Warren Haynes on the studio record and the live album/tour.
  1. Grateful Dead, Terrapin Station . . . I’m certainly no Deadhead but I’ve gotten more and more into them over time, starting of course, like perhaps most neophytes, with Truckin’, on compilations ages ago before purchasing American Beauty, Workingman’s Dead and, how could one resist for the title alone, Live Dead. This is the epic 16-minute title track from their 1977 album, building into a progressive rock and jazz tour de force.
  1. Pink Floyd, Echoes . . . 23-minute closer from the Meddle album in 1971. I don’t know what to say about Echoes except I’ve always liked it, will always like it. Epitomizes Pink Floyd, really.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Goin’ Home . . . Extended jam of more than 11 minutes, rare for the Stones at least on studio albums. From arguably their best early album, Aftermath, in 1966. It was their first release of all-original material.

CKMS Community Connections for 23 August 2021

Show Notes

The studio should be re-opening soon! For now, we’re having another CanCon morning on CKMS Community Connections, with new (to me) music from JSP, Paragon Cause, Sammy Duke, Taylor Davison, Steve Todd, and Cinephonic.

Music Index

Time Title Album Artist
0m00s Theme for CKMS Community Connections ccc
CKMS Community Connections
Steve Todd
0m57s Clear (Prod. Lofsky) Be/Hold (JSP squatting in the foreground, urban horizon in the background)
Be/Hold
JSP
3m11s Questions (single)
7m09s Disconnected Paragon Cause | Autopilot (indistinct watercolour image of person in the rain)
Autopilot
PARAGⴲN CAUSE
10m56s Play Me
13m10s Think I’m Going Crazy Over You (Jupiter Mix)
16m51s The Traveller (Sammy Duke holding a guitar with djembes and guitars around him)
Glass Demons
Sammy Duke
21m52s Pressure Sammy Duke | Terminus (B&W portrait of Sammy Duke with smoke swirling around)
Terminus
26m02s Indigo Sanctuary | Taylor Davison (Taylor Davison upside-down lying in leaves)
Sanctuary
Taylor Davison
28m49s Walked Away
32m23s Sanctuary
36m45s The Good and The Bad
40m51s This Old Fireball   Donald H Johnston/Steve Todd
44m38s Low High ‘N Dyin’
48m03s Life Is Good With You
51m46s Illusions perdues Cinephonic | Les Paradis Artificiel (person walking on a street away from the camera)
Les Paradis artificiels
Cinephonic
57m50s Béton et ferraille

CKMS Community Connections Hour One airs on CKMS-FM 102.7 on Monday from 11:00am to Noon, and Hour Two airs on Saturday from 1:00pm to 2:00pm.

Got music, spoken word, or other interesting stuff? Let us know at office@radiowaterloo.ca or leave a comment on our “About” page.

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Show notes and podcast interview content is Copyright © 2021 by the participants, and released under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution Only license. Copy, re-use, and derivative works are allowed with attribution to Radio Waterloo and a link to this page. Music selections are copyright by the respective rights holders.

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, Aug. 16, 2021 – on air 8-10 p.m. ET

  1. Golden Earring, Are You Receiving Me . . . I’ve been digging back into the Moontan album lately, both on the show and just to listen to, and could have sworn I must have played this recently and was repeating myself too quickly, but no. Haven’t played this particular track of late. It was Candy’s Going Bad I played most recently on the show, one of four of the five extended cuts on the North American version of the album (the European version has six tracks) I’ve played over time. The only one I haven’t played is Radar Love, but this is a deep cuts show for the most part. Solid album, front to back and Are You Receiving Me is one of the best, almost prog-metal/hard rock. Around even longer than The Rolling Stones, who began in 1962, Golden Earring began in 1961 but finally closed up shop, sadly, in February of 2021 after longtime guitarist George Kooymans was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Great band, although to my ears they got a bit too poppy at some points. But they’re definitely much more than just the Moontan album, Radar Love and their other worldwide hit, Twilight Zone. Tracks like Mad Love’s Comin’, for instance, which I’ve showcased before. More soon, perhaps, from the Dutchmen.
  1. Tom Waits, Heartattack And Vine . . . Yes, heartattack, one word. Title cut from the 1980 album and a change of pace from tonight’s opener, via Waits’ indiosyncratic style and sandpaper vocals. Haven’t played him in a while but the, er, Waits is now over. Screamin’ Jay Hawkins covered this tune, in his own unique style.
  1. Traffic, John Barleycorn . . . Traditional English/Scottish tune, done by many bands including Jethro Tull on their semi-acoustic 1992 live album A Little Light Music. From Traffic’s John Barleycorn Must Die album. One of my favorites by one of my favorite bands. It occurred to me to play them this week after I played Steely Dan last week, which led to a discussion with a show follower that included Steve Winwood, which led me to think of playing, er, in Traffic.
  1. The Guess Who, Attila’s Blues . . . Back I go into 1974’s Road Food album, the title cut of which I played some time ago. I always remember a buddy of mine having this album in high school. The hits were Star Baby and Clap For The Wolfman. Nice jaunty tune, with fun lyrics: ‘Have you ever had an aardvark sandwich’ among the many.
  1. The Who, Imagine A Man . . . Beautiful track, lyrically musically, from one of my favorite Who albums and the first studio one I ever bought with my own money and thus kind of grew up with, The Who By Numbers.
  1. Little Feat, All That You Dream . . . Linda Ronstadt helps out Lowell George on vocals on this propulsive track from The Last Record Album (which it wasn’t, from the band).
  1. Atomic Rooster, People You Can’t Trust . . . A funky outing from the previously prog-heavy Rooster. Chris Farlowe, who did covers of various Rolling Stones’ tunes in the 1960s including a No. 1 hit with Out Of Time in 1966, came in on lead vocals in a reconfigured band that retained only founder member Vincent Crane as they embarked on a new direction.
  1. Bert Jansch, 900 Miles . . . The Scottish folkie, usually on guitar, does some banjo picking on this traditional. Jansch founded the band Pentangle and influenced a host of artists including Jimmy Page, Ian Anderson, Al Stewart, Neil Young, Elton John. Well worth digging into both his solo work and Pentangle, you haven’t.
  1. Moby Grape, 8:05 . . . Great and maybe two short a tune by a band that, along with the Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead and others emerged out of the San Francisco scene in the 1960s. They fused country, blues, rock and jazz into a unique stew but were never as successful as some of their musical colleagues, in large measure to to management hassles, well worth reading up on.
  1. Bob Seger, Ain’t Got No Money . . . Good rocker, a cover of a song by Scottish rock singer-songwriter and actor Frankie Miller, from Seger’s 1978 blockbuster Stranger in Town album. Seger cites Miller as a big influence and one only needs to listen to a few Miller tracks to hear it.
  1. Can, I Want More . . . OK, here we go into my maybe increasingly silly song title thing but I just can’t seem to help myself. If you care, here’s how it happens since, due to the studio being closed due to Covid protocols, I’ve been programming my shows. Often, I just search a word in our station computer system to which I’ve loaded thousands of tunes I own, and see what comes up. Or, I’ll search a band and the word comes up in a song title along with similar titles from other bands. So, here come five straight tunes with the word “more’ in their titles/lyrics. Which reminds me: I need to load the Pink Floyd movie soundtrack album More into our system. Anyway, a typically cool track from Can, the German experimentalists. This was a hit single in 1976 in the UK, from the Flow Motion album, a controversial record for the band’s followers, because it dabbled in disco. But I always like it when bands/artists I like take a different path; I tend to follow them wherever they go, until and if, like latter-day Chicago, they lose me.
  1. Can, . . . And More . . . I couldn’t resist adding the companion piece, which was, naturally, the single’s B-side.
  1. Love, Andmoreagain . . . From the classic and influential Forever Changes album which, typical of some such albums, didn’t burn up the charts but rewards the listener.
  1. Bruce Cockburn, More Not More . . . A buddy of mine texted me the other night to tell me he throwing back some tequilla while listening to music, including some Cockburn. That prompted me playing this tune from Humans in 1980. Just a terrific record, front to back, best known perhaps for the single Tokyo, but every one of its 10 songs, like this one, is solid.
  1. Phil Collins, I Don’t Care Anymore . . . I suppose, just occurred to me, I could have played Aerosmith’s No More No More because by this point even I’m tired of this ‘more’ stuff. All good tunes, though, connected only by that one word. And, I played the Aerosmith song fairly recently. This was a hit single from Collins’ second solo album, Hello, I Must Be Going, released in 1982. Heavy metal band Hellyeah, which featured the late Pantera founder and drummer Vinnie Paul, later covered Collins’ tune.
  1. David Bowie, Aladdin Sane . . . Title cut from Bowie’s 1973 album. Atmospheric cut with great piano, and piano solo, by Mike Garson, who worked on many Bowie albums and whose credits also include work with Nine Inch Nails and Smashing Pumpkins.
  1. Rainbow, Black Sheep Of The Family . . . Cover of a tune by British progressive band Quatermass. Ritchie Blackmore’s bandmates in Deep Purple didn’t want to do the cover during sessions for the Stormbringer album in 1974, so Blackmore recorded it for the first Rainbow record a year later.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Worried About You . . . Originally recorded in 1975 for the Black and Blue album, the track didn’t see the light of day on record until 1981’s Tattoo You album, although the Stones did play it at one of their two El Mocambo shows in 1977 in Toronto. The song features a nice guitar solo from Wayne Perkins, who also contributed a great solo to Black and Blue’s Hand Of Fate and nearly got the gig that eventually went to Ron Wood.
  1. Robin Trower,Gonna Be More Suspicious . . . Smokin’ opening riff and typically great playing from Trower on this cut from For Earth Below, 1975. The album also features the late James Dewar, the outstanding vocalist and bass player in Trower’s 1970s band.
  1. Robbie Robertson, American Roulette . . . Great rocker from Robertson’s self-titled first solo album in 1987. It references, without naming them, James Dean, Elvis Presley and Marilyn Monroe and the consequences of their fame.
  1. Lou Reed, Last Great American Whale . . . 1989 was a pretty good year for classic rocker comeback albums: Bob Dylan with Oh Mercy, Neil Young with Freedom, the Stones with Steel Wheels and Reed, with New York, from which I pulled this track.
  1. T-Bone Burnett, House Of Mirrors . . . I’ve said it before but what an artist T-Bone is. Worked with Bob Dylan during the 1970s, producer to the stars, and terrific solo stuff. This could be a companion piece, vocally, to the Lou Reed track above. Very similar style; T-Bone’s tune coming out in 1980 and Reed’s nine years later.
  1. Led Zeppelin, The Battle Of Evermore . . . Beautiful track from Zep IV, with Fairport Convention’s late great Sandy Denny adding her amazing voice to Robert Plant’s.
  1. Rory Gallagher, Crest Of A Wave . . . A ‘galloping’ track, with typically exquisite guitar, from Gallagher’ Deuce album in 1971.
  1. John Mayall, Fly Tomorrow . . . Nine-minute slow-building track from Mayall’s late 1968 album, Blues From Laurel Canyon. It features Mick Taylor on guitar. A year later, he was in The Rolling Stones, on Mayall’s recommendation to the band. Mayall and Taylor later reunited, off and on, on Mayall’s albums. I saw them on the same bill in the mid-1980s at Ontario Place in Toronto. Taylor opened, then joined Mayall’s then-current version of the Bluesbreakers for a few songs.

CKMS News – 2021-08-14 – Supporting Youth through the housing crisis in KW – Part 2

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Host: Sherice Alishaw

The housing crisis leads to more barriers for the marginalized individuals within our community. Residents are facing an affordable housing crisis in Waterloo region. The low income housing waitlist is almost 6 years until you are able to be offered a unit. Marginalized members of this community are struggling to find and maintain stable housing in this region. 

On this episode of CKMS News, we interview Sandy Dietrich-Bell, CEO of OneROOF a youth shelter in Kitchener. Part 2 of the interview focuses on some solutions to the housing crisis and the barriers that youth  face while trying to obtain stable housing.

This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant project and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada and the CKMS Newsroom. 

Check out the archived versions of this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news, and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca

You can follow us on twitter @radiowaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

The Gems Of Life Show With Peter Wright

Today at 6pm.

On today’s show i’m joined by Peter Wright, Peter is the Podcast Host of The Yakking Show.

Join in as Peter shares his journey starting from Africa to Canada, as well as the stories and gems he picked along his journey on his book, listen in to get the name of the book.

Support our shows by subscribing, liking, sharing and commenting on our YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLdfinIbTCK8z5Dw0G3emnA

Connect  with me via email.

fadhwa@thegemsoflife.com

Stay well and safe.

Aspire To Inspire

 

CKMS News – 2021-08-12 – Supporting Youth through the housing crisis in KW – Part 1

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Host: Sherice Alishaw

The housing crisis leads to more barriers for the marginalized individuals within our community. Residents are facing an affordable housing crisis in Waterloo region. The low income housing waitlist is almost 6 years until you are able to be offered a unit. Marginalized members of this community are struggling to find and maintain stable housing in this region. 

On this episode of CKMS News, we interview Sandy Dietrich-Bell, CEO of OneROOF a youth shelter in Kitchener. We discuss the barriers that marginalized members of our community face while trying to obtain stable housing as well as how the community can come together for a solution to this housing crisis. 

This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant project and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada and the CKMS Newsroom. 

Check out the archived versions of this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news, and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca

You can follow us on twitter @radiowaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

CKMS News – 2021-08-11 – Impacts on housing affordability – Short term rentals and “bandit signs” in Waterloo Region

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Host: Trish Holmes

This episode of CKMS News examines the growing number of short-term rentals (e.g., AirBnB) in Waterloo Region and the impact of this on our long-term rental housing market and the need for data collection specifically targeted to gather information about the housing stock.  We talk to the Waterloo By law office and a Kitchener City Councillor about lack of regulations and the lack of data.

The episode also explores the bandit signs advertising house buying, that are illegally displayed alongside roads and high traffic areas throughout our Region. We talk to the Kitchener bylaw office about the signs and what can be done about them.


This program is a part of the “Local Journalism Initiative” grant program and is funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada, the Government of Canada, and the CKMS Newsroom.

Check out the archived versions of  this program and other episodes on radiowaterloo.ca/news., and other stories commissioned under the Local Journalism Initiative at canada-info.ca.

You can  follow us on twitter @RadioWaterloo. If you want to get in touch with comments, or ideas about stories to cover, email us at news@radiowaterloo.ca

So Old It’s New set list for Monday, August 9, 2021 – on air 8-10 pm ET

  1. Drive-By Truckers, Let There Be Rock . . . I was debating whether to start the show with AC/DC/s Let There Be Rock or this one by the Truckers, but settled on this one since I overlooked a southern rock track last week and wanted to set things up, in that vein, with the next tune.
  1. Blackfoot, Highway Song . . . I played the Outlaws’ Green Grass and High Tides and Molly Hatchet’s Fall Of The Peacemakers last week and mentioned that every ‘southern rock’ band seems to have a signature, Freebird-like song and in fact Molly Hatchet covered that iconic Lynyrd Skynyrd tune on their Double Trouble live album. So, anyway, I forgot this one from Blackfoot last week so here it is, another extended cut in the same vein and interesting in that Blackfoot leader Rickey Medlocke, who is a Blackfoot native American, was an original member of Skynyrd. He played drums on some sessions in 1971 and 1972 Skynyrd released their first album, some of the tracks of which later came out on the 1978 archival release Skynyrd’s First . . . And Last. He then formed Blackfoot before returning to the Skynyrd fold as a guitarist in the reconsitituted post-plane crash band.
  1. Bill Wyman, (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star . . . A hit single, in the disco vein, by The Rolling Stones’ bassist, released in 1981. As a Stones’ fanatic, I have all his solo work and while I don’t listen to it all that much, it’s not bad, especially the first two, Monkey Grip and Stone Alone from the early 1970s. And I do like Wyman’s long-ago contribution to the Stones’ Satanic Majesties album, In Another Land, always liked that tune on what is a much-trashed but actually quite good Stones’ album. In terms of Stones’ members solo work I’d rank the boys thusly: 1. Keith Richards. 2. Ronnie Wood (yes, indeed, his solo work is really good especially his first one, I’ve Got My Own Album To Do in 1974 before he was even in the band and Slide On This). 3. Mick Jagger, particularly the Wandering Spirit album which is his most Stones-like and very good. 4. Wyman. 5. Mick Taylor. Brilliant guitarist but sorry, for all the bitching he did about not getting songwriting credits while in the Stones, which might be true, what has he done that is even remotely memorable since he left the band in 1974? I mean seriously. I have literally all his solo work but all I ever listen to is his live stuff which is usually blues covers and Stones’ covers. Love the guy’s playing but, said it before and will repeat it now; I’d say he was more inspired by being in the Stones’ orbit and contributing to the songwriting partnership of Jagger-Richards than the reverse. He’s a great guitarist. That’s it. Not a bad thing, but he isn’t much of a songwriter or he would have long since proved it.
  1. The Rolling Stones, Some Girls . . . Title, and controversial cut due to the ‘black girls just want to get fucked all night I just don’t have that much jam’ lyric. Great tune though. I finally heard them play it live on the stripped-down No Security tour show in 1999. As with the 1978 Some Girls tour, I have a special place for the 1999 tour because of its stripped-down nature and, especially on No Security, the band playing some little-played material like Some Girls the song, Moonlight Mile and the cover tune, Route 66.
  1. Bill Withers, Who Is He (And What Is He To You?) . . . What a great cut from the late great (he died in 2020) artist who is so much more than his well-known hit tunes like Ain’t No Sunshine, Use Me and Lean On Me. Love the lyrics to this one, along with the soulful treatment and funky guitar work.  
  2. Supertramp, Another Man’s Woman . . . I seem to be on a relationship/breakup or whatever thing here by osmosis or whatever, what with the ever-pervasive song title thing I wind up getting into it’s pretty much unconscious, just seems to happen but that’s how our brains work, or at least mine, one thing leads to another. In any event, a great track by the boys, from the Crisis, What Crisis album and yet another band I must credit my older brother by eight years for getting me into when he first brought the previous album, Crime Of The Century, home. Inevitably I would have gotten into all of it, Zep, Hendrix, Tull etc but he certainly helped. RIP, Robert.
  1. Blind Faith, Had To Cry Today . . . Speaking of whom, another via my brother, from the one and only studio album by the supergroup comprised of Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Steve Winwood and Ric Grech. Amazing album, amazing tune.
  1. Quicksilver Messenger Service, Who Do You Love (single edit) . . . Single version of the Bo Diddley track that, on the Happy Trails album, the band extended into a 25-minute suite. Which got me thinking, and thought of it before; I could do a show just of long tracks – stuff like this, Pink Floyd’s Echoes (which I’ve played before), Genesis’ Supper’s Ready (also previously played),Yes’s The Gates Of Delirium (which I almost played, recently) and so on, so maybe a 5 or 6 song set. But then you’d call me lazy. We’ll see. I may do it at some point. 
  1. Budgie, Who Do You Want For Your Love? . . . Typically great track from arguably this underappreciated Welsh hard rock band, although they’ve influenced many including Metallica, who has covered some of their tunes.
  1. U2, Please . . . The Pop album seems to divide people about U2, or at least music journalism critics. I’ve always liked it, including this tune. Good bands, to me, don’t do bad music; they merely explore different things and if you like them, you go with them and are usually enlightened and, if not, that’s cool, too.
  1. Gene Clark, No Other . . . Title cut on the 1974 album by the former Byrd-man. Great stuff, yet the album bombed. Go figure. For music aficionados, it’s well worth reading about the making of the album.
  1. Tony Joe White, Polk Salad Annie . . . Elvis Presley covered this great tune written by White, the ‘swamp rock’ master. Super stuff.
  1. Deep Purple, Painted Horse . . . An outtake from 1973’s Who Do We Think We Are album, later released on expanded reissues of the album. Nice bluesy tune featuring typically great guitar by Ritchie Blackmore.
  1. Funkadelic, You And Your Folks, Me And My Folks . . . From Maggot Brain, an album I got into some years back on the recommendation of a friend. The title cut is brilliant, featuring the amazing guitar playing of Eddie Hazel; I’ve played it before, will again, almost did this week but settled on this shorter cut from the record.
  1. Neil Young, Surfer Joe And Moe The Sleaze . . . From 1981’s Re-Ac-Tor album, which was panned by critics but I’ve always liked, probably because I like all Neil Young albums particularly those in which he calls on his Crazy Horse pals for backup. This one, too, reminds me of when I was out west at that time, northern Alberta in a house with two buddies, evenings spent just hanging out, maybe smoking some pot and one of my buddies had this newfangled (then) turntable you could hold and turn upside down and every which way and the record would keep playing. So, he’d constantly demonstrate it to us until inevitably it was like, ok, we get it, that’s nice.
  1. Joe Jackson, Got The Time . . . Scorching kick butt track from his debut, Look Sharp. Another of those albums and artists I got into during college days. Metal band Anthrax later covered it and it’s funny on the internet to read comments from metal fans saying ‘this is a Joe Jackson song?” It maybe doesn’t compute because they might think of JJ as the jazzy Night and Day album onward, not realizing he really kicked punk/new wave ass on his first three records.
  1. The Tragically Hip, At The Hundredth Meridian . . . Always been one of my favorite Hip tracks, from the Fully Completely album, typically great lyrics. And what other band can you easily find in a computer search of songs by plugging in the word ‘meridian’ ?
  1. Jesus Christ Superstar soundtrack (1970), Heaven On Their Minds . . . noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk noiyk or however one would write/sound out that freaking amazing opening guitar riff to this fantastic track from what for my money is one of the greatest albums of all time,soundtrack or otherwise. But you have to get the original version, 1970, not the 1973 shit show from the movie with present day ‘take’, the bus and all that crap I’ve never been able to get through. No, the one you want is the 1970 version, the one featuring Murray Head as Judas (singing here), Ian Gillan of Deep Purple fame as Jesus and Yvonne Elliman, a huge contributor to Eric Clapton’s 1970s albums, as Mary Magdalene. Outstanding band featuring guitarists Neil Hubbard (Roxy Music, Joe Cocker, etc.) and the late Henry McCullough (Spooky Tooth, The Grease Band (backing Joe Cocker), Paul McCartney/Wings).
  1. Jesus Christ Superstar soundtrack (1970) Pilate’s Dream . . . Just a nice little ditty from Pilate, same album, figured I’d play it. I just like Pilate’s vocals, sung by the late Barry Dennen. I think, perhaps at Easter I suppose would be most appropriate, I might play the entire album on my show, it’s that good and worthwhile. 86 minutes with still some time to spare for other stuff. We’ll see how it goes. Nothing to do with religion, either, I was brought up Catholic but in the fun words of an old friend, I’m a recovering Catholic and long since a-religious.
  1. Stevie Ray Vaughan, Dirty Pool . . . Typically great blues from the late great master.
  1. The Specials, Gangsters . . . The track that got me into ska back in college. Saw The Specials on CITY-TV’s (Toronto) The New Music and I was hooked.
  1. Triumph, Lay It On The Line . . . A hit, and I don’t usually play singles but as the show name goes, so old it’s new at least to some. I always think of this tune on the radio as my then college girlfriend and I were about to watch TV, or something, in her basement rec room one night. Turned out the song lyrics pretty much nailed our relationship. As for Triumph, not a major fan actually although I do love this track but much of their work is overproduced 80s-type stuff for the American market, just my thought. I do like Rock and Roll Machine, their cover of Rocky Mountain Way and the terrific cut from their self-titled debut, Blinding Light Show/Moonchild but that’s about it. I actually was going to play Blinding Light Show tonight but couldn’t find my damn CD to load into our station system. Maybe next time.
  1. Robert Plant, Too Much Alike . . . A fun little duet with US country/folk artist Patty Griffin, with whom Plant had a relationship . This track was previously unreleased but out now on Plant’s outstanding two-CD (if one is still into the physical stuff, I am) compilation Digging Deep: Subterranea, released in 2020. It’s a great way to catch up on what the former Zep singer has been up to, if you haven’t been following (you should have been, ha ha) his great solo work up to the present. Griffin’s own work is well worth listening to.
  1. Steve Earle, Six Days On The Road . . . This is relatively early stuff from Earle, great country rock.
  1. Steely Dan, King Of The World . . . Funky track from 1973’s Countdown To Ecstasy, typically tight, nicely arranged, brilliantly played Steely Dan fare.
  1. The Kinks, Shangri-La . . . Said it before. This ridiculously brilliant song that is a few songs in one, didn’t chart. Aside from in The Netherlands. Wise folk, the Dutch.
  1. Jethro Tull, Blues Instrumental . . . And so this instrumental from the released in 1988 now apparently out of print Tull box set 20 Years of Jethro Tull which I of course own as a huge fan of the band, finally sees the light of day as a credited track on my show. I’ve used it as out-tro exit music to fill in any time, if needed, if I don’t time the shows exactly right, but this time it fit in as a full track in itself so, why not? It’s a nice slow blues tune. It was recorded circa 1978 by Tull then consisting of on this track, Ian Anderson (flute), Martin Barre (guitar), John Glascock (bass), John Evan (keyboards) and Barriemore Barlow (drums).